The Git Experience (Part 3)

Almost a year ago I posted the second part of my git experience series (JDeveloper 11.1.1.6.0: The Git Experience (Part 2)). In this part I announced a third part which should handle working with remote git repositories.

I totally forgot about this. Only after a question on OTN JDeveloper and ADF forum I looked up the older blogs about git. Since the last post a new JDev version 12.1.3 has arrived so I decided to use this new version to continue the series.

In this part we are talking about setting up a remote repository. As remote git server I use GitHub which allows you to easily set up an account for non commercial use without any cost. Please read the all about the process on the GitHub Help web page.

Before we begin we have to talk about security accessing the remote repository. There are multiple possible connection strategies. The more common are ssh and https. Both are supported by GitHub, https is the recommended.

In this blog I use https to authenticate and work with GitHub, all you need to remember is your GitHub username and it’s password. I tested ssh too but like https better as you don’t have to handle the ssh keys on every pc you use (and I use up to 10 different machines).

I assume you have built yourself an account on GitHub which you can use. If you don’t want to create one yourself you can use the repository of this blog (link available at the end of the blog). Creating a new remote repository yourself can’t be done without an account. For those of you part 4 of the series which will be published in a couple of days will talk about how to do real work with remote repositories and introduce GitFlow as work template.

Let’s start with a typical workflow. We want to implement a new application using JDev 12.1.3 and want to use git as version control system. As the development is done on multiple locations, the repository should be accessible for all team members 24/7. This exclude a repository on a local pc which others might not be able to reach (e.g. if it’d down).

We generate a new ADF Fusion Web Application. I spare the walk through this process. As name of the new application workspace we choose BlogReadConfigFile, every other name you like is OK too.

Once the new application workspace is ready we like to put it under git control. We first do this locally by using the ‘Team->Version Application…’ menu. See the gallery below fro the whole process.

Notice the ‘.git’ folder which holds all information about the git versions of the application on your local pc. The fresh created local repository can be used already to make changes and commit them to the local repository. Other team members can clone the repository from your pc if they have access to it.

As the new workspace is under version control we can and should open a new window in JDev via menu ‘ Window->Team->Version’ to get a view of the version information available in JDev:

Open Version Window

Open Version Window

Expanded Version Window

Expanded Version Window

As you’ll notice all remote nodes in the tree are empty. The local master branch is the current branch we are working on, visible through the green badge. Now we want to make this local repository available to a remote git server GitHub. First problem is that JDev 12.1.3 (and all other version I know of) don’t support creating a remote repository. We can add existing remote repositories by right clicking to the ‘Remotes’ node and ‘add remote…’

Add a Remote Repository

Add a Remote Repository

Add Remote Dialog

Add Remote Dialog

As you see you can only add the URL to the remote repository but can’t create it. So we have to create the remote repository on GitHub first. Read ‘Setup a new Repository’ to find out how to do this. Make sure you make it a public repository and leave the check box to init the repository with a README.md file empty for the moment.

Create Repository in GitHub

Create Repository in GitHub

You can add default ‘.gitignore’ fie and a licence via this dialog too. We use a ‘.gitignore’ file from other JDev projects as the default java one doesn’t know about some of the artifacts used by JDev. After finishing the dialog you get the information from GitHub how to get data into the new repository.

How to add Data

How to add Data

If you decide to use ssh instead of https you can click the button on the left side of the URL and the info switches accordingly.

As we already have our local repository we use the second method ‘…or publish an existing repository from the command line’. For this we open a command shell and open the location of the workspace (‘/data/development/ENTW_12.1.3.0.0/QT/BlogReadConfigFile’ on my machine). Copy the commands from the second option into the command shell. You are asked for your credentials to login into GitHub, after that the local repository is pushed to GitHub.

Command Lines to Push Data to Repository

Command Lines to Push Data to Repository

When we look at the GitHub web page we see the data from the workspace

Finished Remote Repository

Finished Remote Repository

As mentioned at the button of the page we should add a README.md file. This can be done directly on the web page or you can add such a file on your local pc and push it to the repository. I like to do this through the web page as it copies the description from the creation of the repository into the file.

Add README.md

Add README.md

Now if we look at the Versions window in JDev we see that the remote repository is visible in JDev too.

Updated Version Window

Updated Version Window

Dev knows about the changes as they all in the ‘.git’ folder in the workspace. Right now command line git , JDev git and third party tools like SmartGit, SourceTree or mysygit (or Tortoise Git on windows) play well together. You can use them interchangeably.

As we have added the README.md file using the web page, out first action is to refresh the workspace to get the README.md file into our local repository. For this we use the menu ‘Team->Git->Pull…’, work through the wizard and check the file system after the work has finished.

This concludes this part 3 of the series. You can clone the repository from GitHub. Stay tuned for the next part where we introduce GitFlow and start working on the repository.

2 thoughts on “The Git Experience (Part 3)

  1. Hi Timo.

    Nice blog. Let me add my oppinion.

    1. I prefer bitbucket over github, because you can also create private repositories for free.

    2. Not using SSH, because you have ten computers is definitely a pain in the ass. I think everybody has this problem, not only with SSH keys. I recommend solving this issue by getting a synology nas and setting up your own cloud for automatic synchronization of all the files between all your computers and mobile devices. Is not cheap, but is definitely worth it.

    See you soon and have a great start in 2015.

    Greetings
    Tobi

  2. Pingback: The Git Experience (Part 4) | JDev & ADF Goodies

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