Summary of Day 5 at Oracle Open World 2016

I started the day with a session on Alta UI ‘Implementing Oracle’s New Alta UI Features’ by Richard Wright. Richard started by giving some reasoning about why Oracle developed Alta UI. It was manly because the users demanded a more mobile friendly UI. The biggest change which came with Alta UI was that the UI has to be build by thinking ‘mobile first’ and by more designing the flow of operations by personas. Only then you gain the full advantage of the Alta UI.

Transforming a older (legacy) application to a modern application using the Alta UI is not just migrating the skin. You have to redo the UI and design it for mobile first.This means that you have to think about different device sizes which in the end means that you have to design the application in a responsive manner.

Here the page stretches on the device. This is mostly not working on small devices as it makes the user to zoom into the right section to see the information. Because of hte size mobile friendly means that you try to visualize the information instead of e.g. showing the user a table. An image is giving information a human can intake more easily than  data in a table.

For a developer this means that using a list view should be preferred over using a table. A list view allows better responsive design.

Summary is that you should

  • Leverage major UI updates as an opportunity
  • Verify actual users versus previously targeted users
  • Target UI for preferred user devices
  • Understand their most important artifacts and tasks

Next session of the day was ‘Cloud-Native Application Development with Oracle Application Container Cloud‘ by Shaun Smith, Anand Kothari and Eric Jacobsen. This session is about the Oracle Application Container Cloud Service which lets you run native Java SE applications or Node.js based application run in the cloud.

I already mentioned the ‘Cloud Native Architecture’ on day 2.



and the demands on the application development

and tools to use to make this architecture work from Oracles point of view

The Application Container Cloud should allow you to make such development simpley by

  • Develop
  • Zip
  • Deploy

your application. This can be done on a polyglot platform using java, php, Node.js and later even Ruby and Java EE. It’s an open platform allowing you to run many applications. Oracle provides a Linux system and you can bring what ever you like.

All this runs on Docker containers. The only constraint is that the applications must be stateless, as the containers are build up and shut down on the fly to load balance your application. This is done automatically without you needing to interfere.

Once your application runs monitoring the JVM or the performance of the application is done via the cloud services. Patching, if needed, is done for you too. Not that you don’t know about it, but it’s just a click on a button. If you don’t like the patch because it breaks your application you can easily rollback the patch

Final session of the day and OOW 2016 for me was ‘Using Docker with Continuous Delivery in Oracle Cloud‘ by Greg Stachnick and Mike Raab. This session talked about how Docker is used in the Oracle Container Cloud Service to allow agile, containerized development in the cloud.

The first part was about the developers cloud which was covered in almost every session about the cloud.


Second part was about the Container Cloud Service and it’s base implementation StackEngine (a company bought by Oracle end of last year).


Key features of the Container Cloud are shown in the image below:


When setting up a service in a docker container the UI looks like


Changes made in the UI are reflected directly in a docker run script (which you can get on the same page). Spinning up a new container is a matter of two clicks:

Stacks are the equivalent to Dockers composer but have some add on like you are able to add parameters to the containers.

In the end the Container Cloud service is a flexible ‘bring your own’ container and run it in hte cloud. Don’t forget to bring the needed licences too🙂

Product will be available within the next 12 month!

That was the OOW2016 for me. See you next year!



One thought on “Summary of Day 5 at Oracle Open World 2016

  1. Pingback: Oracle OpenWorld 2016 Summaries | SOA Community Blog

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