JDeveloper: Advanced Skin Technique

This post is about an advanced technique to change the look and feel of an ADF application. Changes to the look & feel are normally done via a skin which you use to change descriptors which are used by the ADF components. The general technique to do this is described in many blogs and articles like ADF Faces Skin Editor – How to Work with It and the official documentation at Oracle ADF Skin Editor.

In this blog we look at an advanced technique which helps to change the look and feel of components like af:query and pf:panelCollection which you can’t change using the normal available descriptors. In the below image you see the Skin Editor showing the ADF components skin descriptors.

selection_985

Use Case

In this use case we work with the af:panelCollection component. This component is used to wrap af:tree, af:treeTable and af:table components to provide additional functions. From the documentation of af:panelCollection

A panel component that aggregates collection components like table, treeTable and tree to display standard/application menus, toolbars and statusbar items.

The default top level menu and toolbar items vary depending on the component used as the child of the panelCollection.

  • For table, tree and treeTable, the default top level menu item is View.
  • For table and treeTable with selectable columns, the default top level menu items are View and Format.
  • For table and treeTable, the default toolbar item is Detach.
  • For table and treeTable with selectable columns, the default top level toolbar items are Freeze, Detach and Wrap.
  • For tree and treeTable, if the pathStamp facet is used, the toolbar buttons Go Up, Go To Top, Show as Top also appear.

The component allows us to switch off some function

Value Turns off
statusBar Status bar
viewMenu ‘View’ menu
formatMenu ‘Format’ menu
columnsMenuItem ‘Columns’ sub-menu item
columnsMenuItem:col1,col20 Columns with column ID: ‘col1’ and ‘col20’ inside ‘Columns’ sub-menu
freezeMenuItem ‘Freeze’ menu item
detachMenuItem ‘Detach’ menu item
sortMenuItem ‘Sort’ menu item
reorderColumnsMenuItem ‘Reorder Columns’ menu item
resizeColumnsMenuItem ‘Resize Columns’ menu item
wrapMenuItem ‘Wrap’ menu item
showAsTopMenuItem Tree/TreeTable ‘Show As Top’ menu item
scrollToFirstMenuItem Tree/TreeTable ‘Scroll To First’ menu item
scrollToLastMenuItem Tree/TreeTable ‘Scroll To Last’ menu item
freezeToolbarItem ‘Freeze’ toolbar item
detachToolbarItem ‘Detach’ toolbar item
wrapToolbarItem ‘Wrap’ toolbar item
showAsTopToolbarItem Tree/TreeTable ‘Show As Top’ toolbar item
wrap ‘Wrap’ menu and toolbar items
freeze ‘Freeze’ menu and toolbar items
detach ‘Detach’ menu and toolbar items

As a sample the image below shows a normal af:panelCollection (upper half) and an af:panelCollection with the view menu and the toolbar switched off (lower half)

selection_979

Looking at the possible things to switch off we don’t see anything to switch off the ‘Query by Example’ (QBE) icon. There is no feature toggle to turn this function on or off. An easy way to get rid of the icon would be to make the table not filterable. However, if we like the table to be filterable but don’t want to show the icon to switch the feature off, we have to use an advanced skin technique.

What can we do to get rid of the icon in the tool bar?

The idea is to use a skin or special css to hide the icon or the container which holds the icon. To find the container we first inspect the page in the browser using the browsers ‘Developer Tools’ which you can reach by hitting F12 in your browser. Below you see Chrome 55 with activated ‘Developer Tools’

Selection_211.jpg

The image shows the toolbars QBE image as selected element on the page (left red rectangle) and the style classes which are in use for this element (right red rectangle). The names ‘.xfo’ and ‘.xfr’ are the names of the style classes. They are minimized to reduce the download size of the page, but they are not ‘readable’. 

The first thing to do is to make the names ‘readable’ for us. We need to know which skin selector generated the style class. For this we set a context parameter in the web.xml file

 <context-param>
 <param-name>org.apache.myfaces.trinidad.DISABLE_CONTENT_COMPRESSION</param-name>
 <param-value>true</param-value>
 </context-param>

Setting this parameter to true will show us the clear names. The image below shows the same selection only this time with the real names

selection_212

One other nice feature of the ‘Developer Tools’ is that you can inspect elements by just hover over them on the page. This allow us to easily find the element we want to hide via css. Click on the icon marked in hte below image

selection_213

and move the mouse cursor over the page. You see the HTML and the active styles of the element under the cursor. This feature we use to find an element which holds the icon we want to hide and which we can address via css .

selection_214

CSS allows us to address elements inside a skin selector.  For this you need to know the skin selector, the tag or container and it’s ID inside the selector you want to address. In the image above we see the ID of the icon container we want to hide as “id=’pc1:_qbeTbr'” and the container or tag itself which is a ‘div’. The skin selector is the af|panelCollection. With this information we can can change the style attached to the ‘div’ container with the id ‘*_qbeTbr’  in the af|panelCollection as

af|panelCollection div[id$='_qbeTbr'] {
    display: none;
}

This we can add to our skin.css file. However, if we just add it this way it’s changing all af:panelCollection in our application.  If we want this only to be active for specific af:panelColletion we can add a style class name like

af|panelCollection.myPCClass div[id$='_qbeTbr'] {
    display: none;
}

Now we can add the stale class name ‘myPCClass’ to the af:panelCollection when we like the QBE icon not to be shown

 <af:panelCollection id="pc1" styleClass="myPCClass">
   <f:facet name="menus"/>
   <f:facet name="toolbar"/>
   <af:table value="#{bindings.EmployeesView1.collectionModel}" ...
   ...
 <af:panelCollection id="pc2" featuresOff="detachToolbarItem viewMenu">
 <f:facet name="menus"/>
 <f:facet name="toolbar"/>
 ...

will generate this UI output

selection_217

 

As we see, the QBE icon is gone. In the original page we have placed two af:panelCollection components. As you added the new style class only to one of them, the other QBE icon is still visible.

Extending

You can use hte same technique for other complex ADF components like af:query. Here you can style the save button which normally not  supported.

Download

You can download the sample which is build using JDev 12.2.1.2.0  and uses the HR DB schema from GitHub BlogAdvancedSkin

Undo Reorder of Columns in af:table

A question on OTN about how to undo a reorder of columns in an af:table can be undone. In this blog I show how to undo such a reorder to show the columns of an af:table in their natural order.
The natural order is defined when you create the table. You can move the attributes in the create dialog or delete attributes you don’t want to see in the UI from the table.

In the image above we see the dialog after we drop a VO as table onto a page. To change is order of the columns in the table you can use the arrows on the right (in the red rectangle). Once you save the table you can reorder the columns in the property editor of the af:table.

img00003

The order of the columns you see in the dialog or the property editor is what is called default order of the columns. This default order can be different than the order of the attributes in the query the VO is based on.
The page we drop the af:table on is very simple. It is build from a quick layout and has a header for the page title and a panelCollection which holds the table.

img00008

We can reorder the columns in the UI by dragging a column and dropping it at a different location.

The question now is how to undo this manual reorder without refreshing the browser window.

To understand how this is implemented, we need to look how the the reorder is done in the first place. A table is build from one or more columns. Each of the columns describes the data to be shown in the column, the header to show and the display index which is the order of the columns shown in the UI. If the display index is less then zero (e.g. -1) the default order is used. Any other positive number is used to show the columns in ascending order of these display index.
To undo any reorder of the columns is an af:table we simply have to get to each column and set it’s display index to -1.

public class UndoColumnReorderBean {
    private static ADFLogger _logger = ADFLogger.createADFLogger(UndoColumnReorderBean.class);
    private RichTable table;

    public UndoColumnReorderBean() {
    }

    public void undoColunmReorder(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
        _logger.info("Undo reorder...");
        // get the tables child components
        List<UIComponent> children = this.table.getChildren();
        for (UIComponent comp : children) {
            // check if the child is a column
            if (comp instanceof RichColumn) {
                RichColumn col = (RichColumn) comp;
                // if hte display index is greater 0 set it to -1
                if (col.getDisplayIndex() >= 0) {
                    _logger.info("...unset column "+col);
                    col.setDisplayIndex(-1);
                }
            }
        }
        _logger.info("... done!");
    }

    public void setTable(RichTable table) {
        this.table = table;
    }

    public RichTable getTable() {
        return table;
    }
}

The bean above has a method undoColumnReorder which is an action event Listener triggered by clicking the ‘Undo Column Reorder’ button. This method uses the af:table component which is bound to the bean as property. It iterates over the child components of the table, checking if the child is a RichColumn (or af:column in the UI) and if yes sets its display index to -1;
To show the change in the UI, we have to ppr the table by adding the button as partial Trigger to the table

img00007

After clicking the button in the ui the table again looks like

img00004

so the default order of the columns is shown again.

You can download the application from GitHub BlogUndoColumnReorder. The sample is build using JDev 12.2.1.2 but you can do the same with any other JDev version 11g or 12c you use. It uses the HR DB schema.

Reset Table Filter when Navigating to Page

This blog is a continuation of an older blog about how to reset the filters of an af:table component from a bean (How to reset a filter on an af:table the 12c way). In the older blog I described the technique to reset the filters defined in the FilterableQueryDescriptor of a filterable af:table.

Now users on OTN JDev & ADF space ask for a small variation of the use case. The filter should reset whenever a navigation takes place to the page which holds the af:table. No button should be clicked to reset the filter values.

As the original technique can still be used, I don’t go into detail about how to do this. It’s described in the other blog for JDev versions 12c. The same technique can be applied to 11g but different Java code has to be used (see How to reset a filter on an af:table). I changed the sample application, which you can download (see link at the end of the blog), so that the query panel with the af:table has an additional button to navigate to a different page.

Run through

After starting the application we see the page with an empty table as no search was done. Clicking hte search button will give us

selection_910

The ‘Navigate’ button simply navigate to another view which holds twu buttons which let you navigate back to the original page.

selection_911

The ‘back without clear filter’ just navigates back to the page, whereas the ‘back with clear filter’ navigates to a method in the task-flow which prepares the af:table for reset. This is the bounded task flow:

selection_912

The EmpQueryPanel holds the af:query with the result table as shown in the first image. The view is marked as default activity in the task flow. When you first run the application (page RTFQPTest.jsf) the task flow is added as region to the page showing the query panel with the result table.

When you hit the search button on the page the table shows all employees. Now we can filter the results like ‘FirstName’ contain ‘s’ and ‘LastName’ contains ‘k’

selection_913

Now if we hit the ‘Navigate’ button we go to the page shown in image 2 with the two buttons. If we click on hte ‘back without clear filter’ we come back to the page as shown above. The filter values are still present!

If we click on the ‘back with clear filter’ we see

selection_914

so the filter values are cleared. So, how is it done?

Implementation

In the original sample we had a button which we used to trigger a method which get the FilterableQueryDescriptor from the table. This descriptor holds the filter values which are cleared by looping over all ConjunctionCriterion which are the filter values. Here is the full method for 12c

 /**
 * method to reset filter attributes on an af:table
 * @param actionEvent event which triggers the method
 */
 public void resetTableFilter12c(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
   FilterableQueryDescriptor queryDescriptor = (FilterableQueryDescriptor) getEmpTable().getFilterModel();
   if (queryDescriptor != null &amp;&amp; queryDescriptor.getFilterConjunctionCriterion() != null) {
     logger.info("Filter found...");
     ConjunctionCriterion cc = queryDescriptor.getFilterConjunctionCriterion();
     List&lt;Criterion&gt; lc = cc.getCriterionList();
     if (!lc.isEmpty()){
       logger.info("...iterating criterions...");
     }
     for (Criterion c : lc) {
       if (c instanceof AttributeCriterion) {
         AttributeCriterion ac = (AttributeCriterion) c;
         Object object = ac.getValue();
         logger.info("...found " + ac.getAttribute().getName() + " value: " + object);
         if (object != null) {
           ac.setValue(null);
           logger.info("...reset...");
         }
      }
   }
getEmpTable().queueEvent(new QueryEvent(getEmpTable(), queryDescriptor));
  }
}

public void setEmpTable(RichTable empTable) {
 this.empTable = empTable;
}

public RichTable getEmpTable() {
 return empTable;
}

A look into the log after clicking hte ‘back with clear flter’ shows

selection_915

We see that the for loop caught all filters and resetted every filter to null.

The interesting part is how we triggered the call of the method resetTableFilter12c. As there is no button or other action event involved we use a trick. We add a method to the ‘ShortDesc’ property of the af:table which points to a bean method

selection_916

Now, whenever the af:table is rendered it goes to the bean method asking for the test for hte short description. We use the call of this method as trigger to reset the filters. As this method is called multiple times during the JSF lifecycle, we need some kind of flag which tells us that the reset operation is done already. Otherwise we will spende lots of time calling the reset method without need.

public void setShortDescription(String shortDescritopn) {
logger.info("Set ShortDescription called");
this.shortDescription = shortDescritopn;
}

public String getShortDescription() {
logger.info("get ShortDescription called");
AdfFacesContext adfFacesCtx = AdfFacesContext.getCurrentInstance();

// get the PageFlowScope Params
Map<String, Object> scopePageFlowScopeVar = adfFacesCtx.getPageFlowScope();
Boolean reset = (Boolean) scopePageFlowScopeVar.getOrDefault("resetFilter", Boolean.FALSE);
boolean flip = reset.booleanValue();
if (flip) {
logger.info("ResetTable Filter!");
resetTableFilter12c(null);
scopePageFlowScopeVar.put("resetFilter", Boolean.FALSE);
logger.info("Unset filter reset flag!");
}

return shortDescription;
}

As there are cases where the short description is ask for which we don’t want to use as triggers to clear the filters, we need another flag which we can check. For this we set a flag in the pageFlowScope of hte bounded task flow named ‘resetFilter’.  in the method we get the pageFlowScope and read the flag (lines 8-13). Only when the flag is set to true in the pageFlowScope we call theresetTableFilter12c method (line 14-19) and reset the flag to false.

The only thing left to do is to set the flag in the pageFlowScope when we liek the filters to get cleared when navigating to the page. For this we use the method action ‘resetTableFilter’ which is defined in the task flow. This method action points to a bean method

selection_917

which puts the flag ‘resetFilter’ with a value of ‘Boolean.TRUE’ into the pageFlowScope:

public void setRestFlag() {
AdfFacesContext adfFacesCtx = AdfFacesContext.getCurrentInstance();
// get the PageFlowScope Params
Map<String, Object> scopePageFlowScopeVar = adfFacesCtx.getPageFlowScope();
scopePageFlowScopeVar.put("resetFilter", Boolean.TRUE);
logger.info("Set filter reset flag!");
}

Resources

You can download the sample application from GitHub:  BlogResetTableFilter12c

The sample uses JDev 12.2.1.2.0 and the HR DB schema.

Naviagting an af:table in pagination mode from a bean

A question on the JDeveloper and ADF OTN forum asked about how to navigate to a specific page of an af:table in pagination mode. As of JDeveloper 11.1.1.7.0 adf tables can be rendered in scroll mode or in pagination mode where only a specific number of rows are visible in the table.

af:table in pagination mode

To navigate the pages there is a small navigation toolbar below the table which allows to enter a page number or to navigate to the previous, next, first or last page.

The problem to solve is how to navigate the paginated table from within a java bean?

The table doesn’t offer any navigation listeners or methods you can bind bean methods to. Luckily there is the RangeChangeEvent one of the FacesEvents which can e used to notify a component that change in the range has taken place.

All we have to do to navigate the table in pagination mode is to calculate the needed parameters

  • oldStart: The previous start of this UIComponent’s selected range, inclusive
  • oldEnd: The previous end of this UIComponent’s selected range, exclusive
  • newStart: The new start of this UIComponent’s selected range, inclusive
  • newEnd: The new end of this UIComponent’s selected range, exclusive

We add an input field to the page which allow us to enter a page number and a button which we use to call an action listener in a bean.

The running application looks like

Running application

Another button is used to calculate the index of the selected row in the whole rowset, the index on the page and the page number. The row index and the index of the row on the page are zero based, page numbers start with 1. Let’s look at the code:

public void onGotoPage(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
BindingContainer bindingContainer = BindingContext.getCurrent().getCurrentBindingsEntry();
// get number of page to goto
AttributeBinding attr = (AttributeBinding) bindingContainer.getControlBinding("gotopage1");
Integer newPage = (Integer) attr.getInputValue();
if (newPage == null) {
return;
}
// page one starts at index 0 so subtract 1 from the pagen number
newPage--;
DCIteratorBinding iter = (DCIteratorBinding) bindingContainer.get("EmployeesView1Iterator");
// calculate the old and new rages for the RangeChangeEvent
int range = iter.getRangeSize(); // note both the table and we take the page size from the iterator's RangeSize
int oldStart = iter.getRangeStart();
int oldEnd = oldStart + range;
int newStart = newPage * range;
int newEnd = newStart + range;
// find the table
UIViewRoot iViewRoot = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance().getViewRoot();
UIComponent table = iViewRoot.findComponent("t1");
// build the event and fire it
RangeChangeEvent event = new RangeChangeEvent(table, oldStart, oldEnd, newStart, newEnd);
((RichTable)table).broadcast(event);
// update the table
AdfFacesContext.getCurrentInstance().addPartialTarget(table);
}

Line 2-8 we get the new page number we want to navigate to. Line 9-10 we subtract 1 from the given number as the page is zero based internally. In Line 11 we get the iterator which we need to get the range size and the start of the current range (lines 13-15). These values are oldStart and oldEnd. Lines 16-17 we calculate the new start range as page to go multiplied with the range. The newEnd parameter is the newStart pus the range size.
In lines 18-20 we get to the table component on the page. Then we create the RangeChangeEvent and broadcast the event to the table component in lines 21-23. Finally we ppr the table to see the change in the UI.

To show how to calculate the other way around, to get from the selected row in a table to the index on the page, the page number and the index in the rowset we added another button ‘GetPageOfSelectedRow’which calls a listener in the same bean which builds a string with the needed information.

public void onGetCurrentPage(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
BindingContainer bindingContainer = BindingContext.getCurrent().getCurrentBindingsEntry();
DCIteratorBinding iter = (DCIteratorBinding) bindingContainer.get("EmployeesView1Iterator");
// calculate index and page number. Index is zero based!
int currentRowIndex = iter.getRowSetIterator().getCurrentRowIndex();
_logger.info("CurrentRowIndex: " + currentRowIndex);
int currentPage = currentRowIndex / iter.getRangeSize();
currentPage++;
_logger.info("Current Page:" + currentPage);
int indexOnPage = (currentRowIndex % iter.getRangeSize());
_logger.info("Current index on Page:" + indexOnPage);
// get an ADF attributevalue from the ADF page definitions
AttributeBinding attr = (AttributeBinding) bindingContainer.getControlBinding("selectedRow1");
StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();
sb.append("row index overall: ");
sb.append(currentRowIndex);
sb.append(" row index on page: ");
sb.append(indexOnPage);
sb.append(" Page: ");
sb.append(currentPage);
attr.setInputValue(sb.toString());
}

To get the index of the selected row in the whole rowset we need the iterator and get the RowSetIterator from it. The rowSetIterator method getCurrentRowIndex() returns the index of the current row (line 5). The current page is calculated by dividing the current index through the range size (line 7). The final information is the index of the selected row on the page which is calculated as the current index modulo the range size (line 10). The rest of the listener build a string out of this information and writes it to a pageDef variable which is referenced in an outputfield on the page.

<af:outputText value="#{bindings.selectedRow1.inputValue}" id="ot8" partialTriggers="b2"/>

Here are some images from the sample application.

The sample application is build using JDev 12.1.3 and uses the HR DB schema. The sample can be downloaded from  Github

Handling images/files in ADF (Part 5)

I received a couple of questions regarding the handling of the images directly after upload for the sample application done in part 1-4.

    Part 1 gives an overview of the sample application I’m going to build and how to set it up
    Part 2 shows how to upload a file, store it and download it back to the client
    Part 3 implements two techniques to show the data (image) on the user interface
    Part 4 backport of the sample to JDeveloper 11gR1
    Part 5 implements a technique to show the uploaded file right after upload without the need to commit first

The sample application finished in part 3 (part 4 is a backport to JDev 11gR1 only) has one minor glitch: it doesn’t display an uploaded image directly to the user after uploading it. The user has to commit the data after insert or update of an image before the image becomes visible. Users like to see the newly uploaded image before committing the row. This allows the users to cancel the change or select and upload another image. In this 5th part of the series we implement this.

Before we start to implement let’s talk about how to implement this enhancement. Why isn’t it possible to upload the image data into the blob and then just show the image from the blob via the servlet (see part 3)?
The problem is that the BlobDomain uses a stream to read the data uploaded from the user. This stream can only be read after the BlobDomain is saved, meaning after the commit.

The solution we implement in this part stores the uploaded data (inserted or updated) in a temporary file on the server. Then the server uses the image data from the temporary file to visualize the data. This sounds easy enough, however there is some house keeping to do to make it work.

First we have have to find a place (folder) where we can store the uploaded data until it’s stored in the db or the operation is canceled. Then we need to distinguish which data to show from the servlet (file or blob). Finally we have to clean up the temporary file when we are done.

Lets dive into the implementation. We start from the application at the end of part 3. As the current JDeveloper version is 12.1.3 we do the implementation in this version. The first task is to migrate the old application to 12.1.3. This is done automatically when opening the old work space in JDev 12.1.3 by answering the ‘OK’ to the migration popup. Nothing need to be done here. However, when you download  the work space you’ll notice some clean up I did, like changing the old af:commandButton to the new af:button.

One thing to notice is that the Apache Commons-IO version is updated to 2.4. This update made one other change necessary in the weblogic-application.xml file.

  <prefer-application-packages>
    <package-name>org.apache.commons.io</package-name>
  </prefer-application-packages>

This entry allows the application to use the included commons-io jar to be loaded before the already available commons-io jar, of an older version, in WebLogic server 12.1.3.

Here are the steps we take to implement the tasks:
1) Save the uploaded data to a temporary file as well as to the blob. This is done for convenience. It’S possible to store the data first in the temporary file and only copy it to the BlobDomain when the user commits the changes.
We implement a new java class UploadBlob which holds the BlogDomain and the path to the temporary file. This class also allows to test if a temporary is available.

package de.hahn.blog.uldl.view.types;

import oracle.jbo.domain.BlobDomain;

/**
 * This type class holds the BlogDomain and a path to a temporary file holding the uploaded image data
 */
public class UploadBlob {
    /**
     * Holds the uploaded data
     */
    BlobDomain dataBlob;

    /**
     * Path to the temporary file if availabe
     */
    String tempFile;

    /**
     * C'tor.
     */
    public UploadBlob() {
        super();
        tempFile = null;
        dataBlob = null;
    }

    /**
     * Gets the status of the temporary file
     *
     * @return true if a temporary file is available, false otherwise
     */
    public Boolean getTempFileAvailabe() {
        return (tempFile != null ? Boolean.TRUE : Boolean.FALSE);
    }

    /**
     * @param inageBlob
     */
    public void setInageBlob(BlobDomain dataBlob) {
        this.dataBlob = dataBlob;
    }

    /**
     * Gets the BlobDomain holding the uploaded data
     * @return
     */
    public BlobDomain getDataBlob() {
        return dataBlob;
    }

    /**
     * Sete the path to the temporary file holding the uploaded data
     * @param tempFile path to the temporary file
     */
    public void setTempFile(String tempFile) {
        this.tempFile = tempFile;
    }

    /**
     * Getter for path to temp file holding the data of the uploaded data
     * @return path to the temporary file holding the uploaded data
     */
    public String getTempFile() {
        return tempFile;
    }
}

2) Use this class in the ImageBean.java class where the uploaded data is read. This happens in the valueChangeListener uploadFileValueChangeEvent(ValueChangeEvent valueChangeEvent).

    /**
     * @param valueChangeEvent
     */
    public void uploadFileValueChangeEvent(ValueChangeEvent valueChangeEvent) {
        // The event give access to an Uploade dFile which contains data about the file and its content
        UploadedFile file = (UploadedFile) valueChangeEvent.getNewValue();
        // Get the original file name
        String fileName = file.getFilename();
        // get the mime type
        String contentType = ContentTypes.get(fileName);
        // get the current roew from the ImagesView2Iterator via the binding
        DCBindingContainer lBindingContainer = (DCBindingContainer) BindingContext.getCurrent().getCurrentBindingsEntry();
        DCIteratorBinding lBinding = lBindingContainer.findIteratorBinding("ImagesView2Iterator");
        Row newRow = lBinding.getCurrentRow();
        // set the file name
        newRow.setAttribute("ImageName", fileName);
        // create the BlobDomain and set it into the row
        UploadBlob blob = createBlobDomain(file, Boolean.TRUE);
        newRow.setAttribute("ImageData", blob.getDataBlob());
        // set the mime type
        newRow.setAttribute("ContentType", contentType);
        String tmp = (blob.getTempFileAvailabe() ? blob.getTempFile() : null);
        setTemporaryFileVar(tmp);
        UIComponent ui = (UIComponent) valueChangeEvent.getSource();
        // PPR refresh a jsf component
        ui = ui.getParent();
        AdfFacesContext.getCurrentInstance().addPartialTarget(ui);

    }

Instead of reading the data into the BlobDomain a changed method createBlobDomain is called (line 18). the method now returns an instance of the new class UploadBlob. Below is the code of the new method:

    private UploadBlob createBlobDomain(UploadedFile file, Boolean createTempFile) {
        // init the internal variables
        InputStream in = null;
        OutputStream outTmp = null;
        UploadBlob blobDomain = null;
        OutputStream out = null;
        File tempfile = null;
        logger.info("Starting to create UploadBlog from data...");
        try {
            logger.info("... create BlobDomain...");
            blobDomain = new UploadBlob();
            // Get the input stream representing the data from the client
            in = file.getInputStream();
            // if a temporary file should be created , we do this first as we can't get
            // data data back from the blob until we commit the row. in the next step we
            // write the upload data to a temp file and then copy it into the blob
            if (createTempFile) {
                logger.info("... Creating temporary file...");
                File tempdir = FileUtils.getTempDirectory();
                String ext = FilenameUtils.getExtension(file.getFilename());
                if (!ext.isEmpty()) {
                    ext = "." + ext;
                }
                logger.info("... set extension to " + ext + "...");
                tempfile = File.createTempFile("upl", ext, tempdir);
                logger.info("... " + tempfile.getAbsolutePath() + "...");
                // set path to temporary file
                blobDomain.setTempFile(tempfile.getAbsolutePath());
                FileOutputStream fileOutputStream = FileUtils.openOutputStream(tempfile);
                logger.info("... copy data to temporary file...");
                IOUtils.copy(in, fileOutputStream);
                in = FileUtils.openInputStream(tempfile);
                logger.info("... set inputstream for blog to temporary file...");
            }
            // create the BlobDomain datatype to store the data in the db
            blobDomain.setInageBlob(new BlobDomain());
            // get the outputStream for hte BlobDomain
            out = blobDomain.getDataBlob().getBinaryOutputStream();
            // copy the input stream into the output stream
            logger.info("... copy data to BlobDomain ...");
            /*
             * IOUtils is a class from the Apache Commons IO Package (http://www.apache.org/)
             * Here version 2.0.1 is used
             * please download it directly from http://projects.apache.org/projects/commons_io.html
             */
            IOUtils.copy(in, out);
            logger.info("... Finished OK");
        } catch (Exception e) {
            logger.severe("Error!", e);
            if (tempfile != null) {
                // delete temp file on exception but don'T throw one if there is another exception
                logger.info("Deleted temporary file " + tempfile.getAbsolutePath());
                FileUtils.deleteQuietly(tempfile);
            }
        }
        // return the filled BlobDomain
        return blobDomain;
    }

Depending on the new boolean parameter passed to the method a temporary file is created and the uploaded data is first saved to the temporary file. After that the data is copied from the temporary file into the BlobDomain. At this point the path to the temporary file is saved in the new class for later reference. In case of an exception the temporary file is removed.
Finally in line 22 and 23 of the value change listener we check if a temporary file was generated and we set the path to it to a pageDef variable (see Creating Variables and Attribute Bindings to Store Values Temporarily in the PageDef). For this we use the code below.

    /**
     * Set the temporary file name into a page variable for later use
     * @param name
     */
    private void setTemporaryFileVar(String name) {
        // set pathto temporary file to page variable
        BindingContainer bindings = BindingContext.getCurrent().getCurrentBindingsEntry();
        // get an ADF attributevalue from the ADF page definitions
        AttributeBinding attr = (AttributeBinding) bindings.getControlBinding("TemporaryFile1");
        if (attr != null) {
            attr.setInputValue(name);
        }
    }

The variable is used in the af:image component in the editImage.jsff fragment

                   <af:image source="/render_image?id=#{bindings.ImageId.inputValue}&tmp=#{bindings.TemporaryFile1.inputValue}" id="i1"
                              shortDesc="#{bindings.ImageName.hints.tooltip}" inlineStyle="width:200px;" partialTriggers="cb3" visible="true"/>

here the path to the temporary file is passed to the servlet as second parameter ‘tmp’. In lines 24-27 of the value change listener we send a ppr to the parent component of the af:image to show the now uploaded image.

Another thing to do is to cleanup after the user either cancel or commit the changes. This is done in the cancel_action() or the commit_action() in the ImageBean. Here we call the deleteTemporaryFile() method which checks the existence of a temporary file and deletes it.

    /**
     * delete the temporary file if is present
     */
    public void deleteTemporaryFile() {
        String tempfile = getTemporaryFileVar();
        removeTemporaryFile(tempfile);
        setTemporaryFileVar(null);
    }

3) The final part of the implementation is done in the servlet which is used to get the data back to the client. This is simple as we read the second parameter passed to the servlet. If it’s not empty we always read the image data from the temporary file. If the parameter is empty the servlet gets the data by reading the row from the DB and read the data from the blob. Here are the relevant parts from the servlet:

    public void doGet(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) throws ServletException, IOException {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(100);
        String appModuleName = "de.hahn.blog.uldl.model.facade.ULDLAppModule";

        sb.append("ImageServlet ").append(appModuleName);

        try {
            // get parameter from request
            Map paramMap = request.getParameterMap();
            oracle.jbo.domain.Number id = null;
            String tmporaryFilePath = "";
            if (paramMap.containsKey("id")) {
                String[] pVal = (String[]) paramMap.get("id");
                id = new oracle.jbo.domain.Number(pVal[0]);
                sb.append(" id=").append(pVal[0]);
            }
            // check if we find a temporary file name. In this case we allways use this!
            if (paramMap.containsKey("tmp")) {
                String[] pVal = (String[]) paramMap.get("tmp");
                tmporaryFilePath = pVal[0];
                sb.append(" tmp=").append(pVal[0]);
            }

            OutputStream outputStream = response.getOutputStream();
            InputStream inputStream = null;
            BlobDomain image = null;
            String mimeType = null;
            // no temporary file path given, read everything from DB
            if (tmporaryFilePath.isEmpty()) {
                // get method action from pagedef
                BindingContext bindingContext = BindingContext.getCurrent();
                DCBindingContainer amx = bindingContext.findBindingContainer("de_hahn_blog_uldl_view_image_dummyPageDef");
                JUCtrlActionBinding lBinding = (JUCtrlActionBinding) amx.findCtrlBinding("getImageById");
                // set parameter
                lBinding.getParamsMap().put("aId", id);
                // execute method
                lBinding.invoke();
                // get result
                Object obj = lBinding.getResult();
                ImageAccessViewRow imageRow = (ImageAccessViewRow) obj;

                // Check if a row has been found
                if (imageRow != null) {
                    // Get the blob data
                    image = imageRow.getImageData();
                    mimeType = imageRow.getContentType();
                    // if no image data can be found and no temporary file is present then return and do nothing
                    if (image == null) {
                        mLogger.info("No data found !!! (id = " + id + ")");
                        return;
                    }
                    inputStream = image.getInputStream();
                } else {
                    mLogger.warning("No row found to get image from !!! (id = " + id + ")");
                    return;
                }
                sb.append(" ").append(mimeType).append(" ...");
                mLogger.info(sb.toString());
            } else {
                // read everything from temporary file path
                mimeType = ContentTypes.get(tmporaryFilePath);
                File file = FileUtils.getFile(tmporaryFilePath);
                FileInputStream fileInputStream = FileUtils.openInputStream(file);
                inputStream = fileInputStream;
            }

            // Set the content-type. Only images are taken into account
            response.setContentType(mimeType + "; charset=utf8");
            IOUtils.copy(inputStream, outputStream);
            if (tmporaryFilePath.isEmpty()) {
                // cloase the blob to release the recources
                image.closeInputStream();
            }
            inputStream.close();
            // flush the outout stream
            outputStream.flush();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            mLogger.log(Level.WARNING, "Fehler bei der Ausführung: " + e.getMessage(), e);
        } finally {
            mLogger.info("...done!");
        }
    }

The gallery below shows the new work flow.

The work space for part 5 can be downloaded from the ADF EMG Sample side BlogUploadDownload_12.1.3V4.zip.
Or if you are in GIT you can get the work space from GitHub BlogUploadDownload_12.1.3V4

JDev 12.1.3: Using Parent Action to Navigate Tabs of a af:panelTabbed from Inside a Region

This blog is based on a question in the OTN JDeveloper and ADF forum. The Question was how to navigate from one selected tab to the next tab when the af:showDetailItem in the tab is a region and the button to navigate is inside the region.

We implement two cases, the first is the easy one where the button to navigate is in the page holding the af:panelTabbed. The second one uses a button is inside a bounded task flow which is shown in the af:showDetailItem in a tab to navigate the af:panelTabbed.

We start with creating a new ‘ADF Fusion Web Application’ from the gallery. We only change the application name and the path of the application, otherwise we can just use the default values. The sample is simple and doesn’t need a model project or connection to a DB. You can download the finished workspace using the link provided at the end of the post.

We skip all the needed steps and going right into creating the starting page which holds the af:panelTabbed. It has three af:showDetailItem and a af:Button to navigate the tabs directly from the page. This button implements the first use case.

Start Page with Outer Navigation

Start Page with Outer Navigation

The button has a listener attached which is implemented in a viewScope bean ‘NavigateTabBean’. The listener implements the needed logic to navigate from the selected tab to the next tab. If the last tab is reached the first tab is selected.

    private static ADFLogger _logger = ADFLogger.createADFLogger(NavigateTabBean.class);
    private static final String PANELTAB = &quot;pt1&quot;;

    /**
     * Eventhandler to navigate to the next tab in a af:panelTabbed
     * @param actionEvent event which called the listener
     */
    public void naviGateButtonAction(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
        UIComponent ui = getUIComponent(PANELTAB);
        if (ui == null) {
            _logger.info(&quot;PanelTab component not found!&quot;);
            return;
        }
        if (!(ui instanceof RichPanelTabbed)) {
            _logger.info(&quot;Component is not an af:panelTabbed&quot;);
            return;
        }

        RichPanelTabbed rpt = (RichPanelTabbed) ui;
        int childCount = rpt.getChildCount();
        List&lt;UIComponent&gt; children = rpt.getChildren();
        for (int ii = 0; ii &lt; childCount; ii++) {
            UIComponent uiSDI = children.get(ii);
            if (uiSDI instanceof RichShowDetailItem) {
                RichShowDetailItem rsdi = (RichShowDetailItem) uiSDI;
                if (rsdi.isDisclosed()) {
                    //close current tab
                    rsdi.setDisclosed(false);
                    //calculate next tab to disclose as next_tab_index = (current_tab_index + 1) % number_of_tabs
                    int kk = ii + 1;
                    int jj = kk % childCount;
                    _logger.info(&quot;old disclosed tab: &quot; + ii + &quot; new disclodes tab: &quot; + jj);
                    RichShowDetailItem newSDI = (RichShowDetailItem) children.get(jj);
                    //open new tab
                    newSDI.setDisclosed(true);
                    AdfFacesContext.getCurrentInstance().addPartialTarget(rpt);
                    return;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    // find a jsf component
    private UIComponent getUIComponent(String name) {
        FacesContext facesCtx = FacesContext.getCurrentInstance();
        return facesCtx.getViewRoot().findComponent(name);
    }

    public void nextTab() {
        naviGateButtonAction(null);
    }

The logic in the action listener first searches for the af:panelTabbed in the viewRoot and gets the number of children from it. Each child is one of the af:showDetailItem representing a tab. Then we iterate over the child list and search the currently disclosed tab. We close this tab and the next tab in the list gets disclosed. If the currently selected tab is the last in the list, the first tab is disclosed (see the comments in the code section).

To Implement the second use case, the one we really want to talk about, we first need to implement three bounded task flows which we later use as regions in the tabs.

Bounden Task Flow with Parent Action

Bounden Task Flow with Parent Action

The image shows the bounded task flow for one tab. The other bounded task flows are build in the same way and are just showing different text. The reason for this is that you normally would use different regions aka different task flows in the tabs. We could have used only one bounded task flow with a parameter to change the text shown in the fragment. In the sample you’ll find this implemented for tabs 4 and 5.
The region is simple and only shows one fragment which has a button to navigate to the next tab and a test to distinguish the regions when navigating. The whole magic is the parent action in the bounded task flow. This parent action executes a navigation case ‘nextTab’ in the parent task flow.

Unbounded Task Flow with Start Page

Unbounded Task Flow with Start Page

In the image above we the the unbounded task flow which is the parent of the bounded task flow. Here a wild card rule navigates to a method call activity ‘selectNextTab’ using the navigation case ‘nextTab’ we entered to the parent action of the regions.
The method action calls the ‘nextTab()’ in the managed bean from the code section above. All this method does is to call the action listener which is called from the af:Button of the start page (Start.jsf). As the action listener needs an ActionEvent as parameter, which we don’t use in the code we pass ‘null’ when we call the listener from the method call activity.

This concludes the implementation. Here are some images from the running application

The sample application can be downloaded form ADFEMG Sample Project.

A version of the software build with JDeveloper 11.1.1.7.0 can be downloaded from GitHub

JDev 12.1.3: Use Default Activity Instead of the Deprecated Invoke Action

Since JDeveloper 12.1.3 the invoke action used in earlier version has been deprecated. Users still using the old invoke action to load data on page load should migrate their code to using the default activity in a bounded task flow instead. This article describes how to use the executeWithParams method as a default activity in a bounded task flow (btf) to load data to be shown in a region. For this we implement a common

Use Case:
in a text field the user enters a string which should be used to look-up data in the DB and show the data as a table in a region.
For this we use the HR schema and build a look-up for locations after the name of the city of the location. In a page the user can insert the name or part of a cities name into a text field. This input is send as parameter to a bounded task flow. The default activity of the btf calls a method in the view object which uses a view criteria to search for cities starting with the given input data. In a second implementation the same technique is used but a where clause is used in the VO and the VO is called with executeWithParams. The result of the search is displayed as a table in a region.

Implementation

Model Project:
We start by creating a new ‘Fusion Web Application’ and creating a model project of the HR DB schema. Here we only use the location table for which we create entity object and view object.
Now we create the view criteria which we use to find locations by part of the city name.

Next step is to create the java class for the view object including the method to safely access the created bind variable. In the class we add a method to apply the created view criteria which we expose in the client interface well as the methods to access bind variables.


Finally we have to make sure that the locations view object is part of the data model of the application module.
Resulting Application Module Data Model

Resulting Application Module Data Model


Next we add another view object to the data model which we use to implement the use case a second time. This time we use the view criteria we defined in the view object LocationsView and select it as the default where clause.

ViewController Project:
We start implementing the view controller project by first adding a start page, ‘Start’, to the unbounded task flow in adfc-config.xml. For this page we use a quick layout (One Column, Header stretched).

After opening the page (which creates it) we add a third grid row to the panelGridLayout we got from the quick layout which later holds the result table. In the first grid row we add a captain for the page, ‘Execute with param sample’, the second grid row we add an af:inputText which holds the users input for the city name to search for.
The page looks like

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<f:view xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">
    <af:document title="Start.jsf" id="d1">
        <af:form id="f1">
            <af:panelGridLayout id="pgl1">
                <af:gridRow height="50px" id="gr1">
                    <af:gridCell width="100%" halign="stretch" valign="stretch" id="gc1">
                        <!-- Header -->
                        <af:outputText value="ExecuteWithParams Test" id="ot1" inlineStyle="font-size:x-large;"/>
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
                <af:gridRow height="50px" id="gr2">
                    <af:gridCell width="100%" halign="stretch" valign="stretch" id="gc2">
                        <!-- Content -->
                        <af:inputText label="City" id="it1" value="" autoSubmit="true"/>
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
                <af:gridRow id="gr3">
                    <af:gridCell id="gc3">
                        <!-- REGION HERE -->
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
            </af:panelGridLayout>
        </af:form>
    </af:document>
</f:view>

Now we create a pageDefinition for the page, where we define a variable and an attribute binding which holds the users input into the inputText we added to a grid row below the header.


The final inputText look like

<af:inputText label="City" id="it1" value="#{bindings.searchCityName1.inputValue}" autoSubmit="true"/>

As you see we set the autoSubmit property to true as we don’t have (and need) a button to submit the data to the binding layer.

The next task is to create a new bounded task flow which has one input parameter, which is used to search for locations with cities starting with the given parameter from the inputText component.

Once the bounded task flow is created we can drag this btf onto the start page and drop it in the girdCell in the third gridRow and wire the parameter for the task flow to the value we have stored in the in the variable iterator via the inputText.

Finally we make the region refresh whenever the inputParamter of the task flow changes by setting the regions refresh property to ‘ifNeeded’.
The final ‘Start’ page layout looks like

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<f:view xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">
    <af:document title="Start.jsf" id="d1">
        <af:form id="f1">
            <af:panelGridLayout id="pgl1">
                <af:gridRow height="50px" id="gr1">
                    <af:gridCell width="100%" halign="stretch" valign="stretch" id="gc1">
                        <!-- Header -->
                        <af:outputText value="ExecuteWithParams Test" id="ot1" inlineStyle="font-size:x-large;"/>
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
                <af:gridRow height="50px" id="gr2">
                    <af:gridCell width="100%" halign="stretch" valign="stretch" id="gc2">
                        <!-- Content -->
                        <af:inputText label="City" id="it1" value="#{bindings.searchCityName1.inputValue}" autoSubmit="true"/>
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
                <af:gridRow id="gr3">
                    <af:gridCell id="gc3">
                        <af:region value="#{bindings.showlocatiobycitybtf1.regionModel}" id="r1"/>
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
            </af:panelGridLayout>
        </af:form>
    </af:document>
</f:view>

This concludes the first implementation and we can run the application

The sample application can be downloaded form ADFEMG Sample Project. It contains a second page (Start2) which uses the other view object (LocationsWithParamsView) inside the region. It’s build like the first version. The difference is that the default activity nor is the executeWithParams from the VOs operations instead the self implemented method from the VO. You spare writing the method and exposing the method in the client interface this way.
Be aware that the sample uses the HR DB schema and you have to change the connection information to point to your DB.

JDeveloper 11g R1: Advanced Multi Column Table Sort

A question on the JDeveloper and ADF Community Space found my attention. A user asked how to sort an af:table after more then one column.
Well, there is the official way, which Frank Nimphius’s bloged about in ‘Declarative multi-column sort for ADF bound tables’.
However this declarative approach needs the user to select the columns and their sort order. In most cases the sort after a second column is driven by the use case specification. A sample would be that the departments tables should normally be sorted after the column selected by the user, but then the data should always be sorted by the department name inside the first sort.
The image below shows the Departments table sorted first after the LocationId and inside the LocationId sorted by the DepartmentName.

Departments sorted after LocationID and DepartmentName

Departments sorted after LocationID and DepartmentName

Now lets see how to implement this. There are some possible solutions:

  1. add a sort criterion in a managed bean
  2. add a sort Criterion in the ViewObject
  3. a combination of 1) and 2)

All solutions have their advantages and disadvantages. Let’s start with the managed bean approach. This is pretty simple as we only need to add sortListener to the af:table which is pointing a bean method. In the sample below we are using the departments table where we wire up the secondary sort to the DepartmentName column.

<af:table value="#{bindings.DepartmentsView.collectionModel}" var="row" rows="#{bindings.DepartmentsView.rangeSize}"
...
    sortListener="#{DepartmentSearchBean.sortTableListener}">
...

And the sortTableListener in the bean

    public void sortTableListener(SortEvent sortEvent) {
        //log the selected column (just for information)
        List<SortCriterion> criteria = sortEvent.getSortCriteria();
        for (SortCriterion sc : criteria) {
            logger.info("Sort after: " + sc.getProperty());
        }
        // Create new SortCriterion for DepartmentName in ascending order
        SortCriterion scNew = new SortCriterion("DepartmentName", true);
        // Add it to the list
        criteria.add(scNew);
        // and apply it back to the table
        Object object = sortEvent.getSource();
        RichTable table = (RichTable) object;
        table.setSortCriteria(criteria);
        logger.info("----------------------END----------------------");
    }

That’s all we need to do to get the output from the first image. You’ll notice, that both columns are showing the sort icon. Only the one for the DepartmentName can’t change to descending order as we wired things up to always sort in ascending order. From the users point of view this can be disturbing as it’s not obvious why this happens.

For the second solution we use the model layer instead of the view layer. Here we implement the ViewObjectImpl class of the EmployeesView and overwrite the setOrderByOrSortBy(…) method. This is the method the framework calls when you click on a header on the table to sort it.
Now we can hard wire the secondary sort column, as we did in the managed bean. However, let’s think about how to make this more flexible. A nice add on is that we can use the custom properties of each table attribute to define the secondary sort column. This way we can decide which columns to sort after for each of the attributes available. We can even decide to add more then one column for secondary and third sort.

The overwritten setOrderByOrSortBy method looks for the custom property named ‘SECONDARY_SORT’ and if found, creates a new SortCriterion with the column name give in the custom property. This new sort criterion is then added to the list of SortCriteria.

    @Override
    public String setOrderByOrSortBy(SortCriteria[] sortCriteria) {
        SortCriteriaImpl scNew = null;
        // iterate current sort criteria
        for (int i = 0; i < sortCriteria.length; i++) {
            logger.info("Sort: " + sortCriteria[i].getAttributeName());
            // check for SECONDARY_SORT propertie on each attribute
            int attributeIndexOf = this.getAttributeIndexOf(sortCriteria[i].getAttributeName());
            AttributeDef attributeDef = this.getAttributeDef(attributeIndexOf);
            Object object = attributeDef.getProperty("SECONDARY_SORT");
            if (object != null) {
                logger.info("Secondary sort:" + object.toString());
                scNew = new SortCriteriaImpl(object.toString(), false);
            }
        }

        if (scNew != null) {
            // Create a new array for the added criteria
            SortCriteria scNewArray[] = new SortCriteria[sortCriteria.length + 1];
            for (int j = 0; j < sortCriteria.length; j++) {
                scNewArray[j] = sortCriteria[j];
            }

            // add the new criteria
            scNewArray[sortCriteria.length] = scNew;
            //and exceute the search
            return super.setOrderByOrSortBy(scNewArray);
        }
        
        return super.setOrderByOrSortBy(sortCriteria);
    }

The image blow shows the result for the employees table which is first sorted after the ManagerId and then after the FirstName of the employee.

Sort after ManagerId and LastName

Sort after ManagerId and LastName

As you see, only the ManagerId column shows the sort icon. The secondary sort column, FirstName, doesn’t show the sort icon.

You can download the sample application, which uses the HR DB schema from the ADF-EMG ADF Samples Repository: BlogAdvancedTableSort.zip

JDev 12c: How to reset a filter on an af:table the 12c way

This post is a continuation of an earlier blog about how to reset a filter on an af:table.
A question on OTN JDev and ADF spaces brought a change to my attention which I like to share here.
Using the code from the former post now results in a depreated warning in 12c:

    public void resetTableFilter(ActionEvent actionEvent)
    {
        FilterableQueryDescriptor queryDescriptor =
            (FilterableQueryDescriptor) getEmpTable().getFilterModel();
        if (queryDescriptor != null && queryDescriptor.getFilterCriteria() != null)
        {
            queryDescriptor.getFilterCriteria().clear();
            getEmpTable().queueEvent(new QueryEvent(getEmpTable(), queryDescriptor));
        }
    }

Warning(7,28): getFilterCriteria() in oracle.adf.view.rich.model.FilterableQueryDescriptor has been deprecated

and a look into the javadoc for the getFilterCriteria() method showed

Deprecated. Please use #getFilterConjunctionCriterion

AFAIK you only get the javadoc if you have access to the source code of ADF which you can get via support.oracle.com.

Knowing what to use instead of the deprecated method is half the solution. It turned out that it’s not enough to to use the new method to get the FilterConjunctionCriterion but that you have to iterate over the ConjunctionCriterion and reset them one by one. Here you have to check which type of ConjunctionCriterion you get from the iterator as there are two

  1. AttributeCriterion
  2. ConjunctionCriterion

Only the AttributeCriterion needs to be reset, the ConjunctionCriterion represents a group of AttributeCriterion.
The final code looks like:

    /**
     * method to reset filter attributes on an af:table
     * @param actionEvent event which triggers the method
     */
    public void resetTableFilter(ActionEvent actionEvent) {
        FilterableQueryDescriptor queryDescriptor = (FilterableQueryDescriptor) getEmpTable().getFilterModel();
        if (queryDescriptor != null && queryDescriptor.getFilterConjunctionCriterion() != null) {
            ConjunctionCriterion cc = queryDescriptor.getFilterConjunctionCriterion();
            List<Criterion> lc = cc.getCriterionList();
            for (Criterion c : lc) {
                if (c instanceof AttributeCriterion) {
                    AttributeCriterion ac = (AttributeCriterion) c;
                    ac.setValue(null);
                }
            }
            getEmpTable().queueEvent(new QueryEvent(getEmpTable(), queryDescriptor));
        }
    }

The rest of the implementation remained unchanged so you only need exchange the resetTableFilter method in ResetTableFilterBean.java.
The sample used the HR schema as DB connection. You can download the sample workspace for JDev12c from the ADF-EMG Sample Repository.

Case Study: Backporting a JDeveloper Project from11gR2 to 11gR1

I got a couple of queries to backport my file and image handling sample, which was built using JDeveloper 11.1.2.x version, to JDeveloper 11.1.1.x version. This I have done and like to share the steps on how to do this.

Here are the general steps:

  1. copy the workspace from 11gR2 into a fresh folder which you should onöy access with 11gR1. It’s essential to don’t open one workspace with different workspaces as this might change descriptors and or files.
  2. open the ‘.jsw’ file in 11gR1. If you get a message if you want to migrate answer ‘yes’
  3. recompile the model project.
  4. make the necessary changes to the viewController project files: ui pages and descriptors
  5. Test the application

As base for this case study we use the sample BlogUploadDownloadV2.zip which is the final sample from the Part 3.

1) unzip the sample into a fresh folder. We use the same folder names from the zip archive, but use a different base directory (backport in this case)
2) The images below show the steps to take after copying the files into the backport folder and opening the ‘.jws’ file. Don’t be fooled by the wizard which tell you that the files are converted from jsf1.0 to jsf1.2. Somehow hte wizard only knows that that the files are not jsf1.2 so it assumes that they are jsf1.0.

3) The database project don’t need any attention. The model project can just be recompiled. Here are the last lines after the rebuild. If you like you can test application module using the application module tester

...
Validating Business Component: de.hahn.blog.uldl.model.businessobjects.Catalog
  copying de/hahn/blog/uldl/model/businessobjects/Catalog.xml to output directory
Updated file:/Q:/backport/BlogUploadDownload/ULDLModel/classes/META-INF/adfm.xml
[7:11:42 PM] Successful compilation: 0 errors, 0 warnings. 

4) Now we have to make some obvious changes to the ViewController project. Fist we have to check if the ui pages are built using JSPX pages of JSF pages. A look into the public_html folder reveals that there is only one page (Catalog.jsf) which was built as JSF page. In a first step we rename the file to Catalog.jspx. Fragments have the suffix ‘.jsff’ in both versions, but are based on different schemas. However, we don’t need to rename the fragments.
Now we refresh the viewController project to see the new jspx file.

Refresh Project

Refresh Project


When we open the file we’ll see an error which is hte result that we tried to open a jsf (renamed only to jspx) page in 11gR1.
Error opening the Catalog.jspx

Error opening the Catalog.jspx


We ignore the error and continue our work. To fix the error we have to look into the file (source) and see that the jsf page uses a different root element:

<f:view xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">

whereas a jspx page uses

<jsp:root xmlns:jsp="http://java.sun.com/JSP/Page" version="2.1" xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
          xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">
  <jsp:directive.page contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"/>
<f:view xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">

After changing this root element and adding the close tag, the whole page look like

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<jsp:root xmlns:jsp="http://java.sun.com/JSP/Page" version="2.1" xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
          xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">
    <jsp:directive.page contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"/>
    <f:view xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">
        <af:document title="Catalog.jspx" id="d1">
            <af:form id="f1" usesUpload="true">
                <af:panelStretchLayout topHeight="50px" id="psl1">
                    <f:facet name="top">
                        <af:outputText value="Upload Download Test" id="ot1" inlineStyle="font-size:xx-large;"/>
                    </f:facet>
                    <f:facet name="center">
                        <af:region value="#{bindings.catalogtaskflowdefinition1.regionModel}" id="r1"/>
                        <!-- id="af_one_column_header_stretched"  -->
                    </f:facet>
                </af:panelStretchLayout>
            </af:form>
        </af:document>
    </f:view>
</jsp:root>

We still see red marks in the right side gutter of the file. These are because we have not jet changes the libraries used by the project. After removing the JSF2.0 library we use the ‘Code Assist’ function of JDeveloper to add the correct JSF1.2 tag libs and libraries.


You may have to close JDeveloper and reopen it again to get rid of the red marks. After this you can open hte Catalog.jspx file in design mode:
Migrated Catalog.jspx

Migrated Catalog.jspx


The next step is to look into the ‘.jsff’ fragments. These too are using a different schema. This is the JSF2.0 fragment which uses a tag:

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<ui:composition xmlns:ui="http://java.sun.com/jsf/facelets"
                xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich"
                xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">

The JSF1.2 fragment uses a jsp:root element instead:

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<jsp:root xmlns:jsp="http://java.sun.com/JSP/Page" version="2.1" xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich" xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">

Changing the ui:component tag to the jsp:root tag (don’t forget to change the end tag) the fragments can be opened in design mode too. Depending on the components you have used in your may have to change some ui components to get your page to work.
Next step is to adjust the Databindings.cpx which still holds a link to the Catalog.jsf page.

Old Databindings.cpx

Old Databindings.cpx


Open the file in source mode and change the ‘Catalog.jsf’ to ‘Catalog.jspx’. Next we have to check the ‘adfc-config.xml’ which holds a reference to the ‘Catalog.jsf’ page. This we change to ‘Catalog.jspx’.
Now we are ready to try to run the backported app the first time. We check the DB connection first, then run the application.

<20.05.2013 20:58 Uhr MESZ> <Error> <J2EE> <BEA-160197> <Unable to load descriptor P:\jdeveloper\system\system11.1.1.7.40.64.93\o.j2ee\drs\BlogUploadDownload/META-INF/weblogic-application.xml of module BlogUploadDownload. The error is weblogic.descriptor.DescriptorException: Unmarshaller failed
	at weblogic.descriptor.internal.MarshallerFactory$1.createDescriptor(MarshallerFactory.java:161)
	at weblogic.descriptor.BasicDescriptorManager.createDescriptor(BasicDescriptorManager.java:323)
	at weblogic.application.descriptor.AbstractDescriptorLoader2.getDescriptorBeanFromReader(AbstractDescriptorLoader2.java:788)
...
	at weblogic.work.ExecuteThread.run(ExecuteThread.java:178)
Caused by: com.bea.xml.XmlException: weblogic.descriptor.BeanAlreadyExistsException: Bean already exists: "weblogic.j2ee.descriptor.wl.LibraryRefBeanImpl@eadc995c(/LibraryRefs[[CompoundKey: adf.oracle.domain]])"
	at com.bea.staxb.runtime.internal.util.ReflectionUtils.invokeMethod(ReflectionUtils.java:54)
	at com.bea.staxb.runtime.internal.RuntimeBindingType$BeanRuntimeProperty.setValue(RuntimeBindingType.java:539)
...

This error points to one of the descriptors we did not check up to now. The ‘/LibraryRefs[[CompoundKey: adf.oracle.domain]]’ is defined in the weblogic-application.xml file which we find ‘Application Resources’->’Descriptors’->’META-INF’ node.

weblogic-appliaction.xml

weblogic-appliaction.xml


Here we see that there are multiple entries for the same listeners and library-ref entries. These entries are getting duplicated each time you open the project (or restart JDeveloper). The reason for this is that the ‘xsi:schemaLocation’ is pointing to the wrong version ‘1.1’ (and location) in this case. The correct version for the 11gR1 is ‘1.0’. We replace the wrong schema with the correct one and remove the duplication entries.

<weblogic-application xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
                      xsi:schemaLocation="http://www.bea.com/ns/weblogic/weblogic-application http://www.bea.com/ns/weblogic/weblogic-application/1.0/weblogic-application.xsd"
                      xmlns="http://www.bea.com/ns/weblogic/weblogic-application">

Before we run the application again we check need to check the web.xml which contains a couple of entries which are not needed using 11gR1.
There ‘context-param’s javax.faces.PARTIAL_STATE_SAVING, oracle.adf.view.rich.security.FRAME_BUSTING, javax.faces.FACELETS_VIEW_MAPPINGS, javax.faces.FACELETS_SKIP_XML_INSTRUCTIONS, javax.faces.FACELETS_SKIP_COMMENTS, javax.faces.FACELETS_DECORATORS and javax.faces.FACELETS_RESOURCE_RESOLVER should be removed.
After these changes the application is ready to run.
5) Test run the application

Running Backported Application

Running Backported Application

If you like to use hte new skyros skin you neet to alter the trinidad-config.xml to:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<trinidad-config xmlns="http://myfaces.apache.org/trinidad/config">
  <skin-family>skyros</skin-family>
  <skin-version>v1</skin-version>
</trinidad-config>

The last things to check is the ‘transaction isolation level’ of the task flows and the ‘ChangeEventPolicy’ of the iterators. The default ‘ChangeEventPolicy’ has been changed for 11gR2 applications to ‘ppr’ whereas it was ‘none’ for 11gR1. This change might not be visible at first, but you may notice some flicker in the table of the sample. This is the result of the new ‘ChangeEventPolicy’. If you check it back to none, you have to app the partial triggers to the components yourself. This is done in the sample which comes with Part 4 of the file and image handling sample.

There sure are more things to change, which I did not mention. This is because I did not need to change them ot did not find them. If you come across suhc a missing thing, please drop me a note so that I can add this to this article.