JDeveloper: executeWithParams Problem: bind variable setters are not called

In one of my current bigger ADF projects (yes, there are still big ADF projects!) I had a problem with the ‘executeWithParams’ operation binding called from a bean. To understand the problem I first give a brief description.

Problem

We have a special string column in some of our VOs. For this column, there is a bind parameter which is added to the where clause of the VO. Getter and setter for this bind parameters are generated to be able to set this parameter safely. In the setter method, some checks are done and special formatting is applied to the passed value.

Now we used the VOs executeWithParams operation to create a search form. Hitting the button to execute the query gave us a wrong result. As it turned out, that the execWithParams operation passes the parameters to the VO but it doesn’t use the getter/setter methods for the parameter. The parameters are directly set into the slots by the VariableManager.

Solutions

We want to transform or convert the given parameter right in the query. This way the developer doesn’t need to think about or to remember that there should be a transformation of the parameter. A central solution is preferred. Two solutions come to mind.

Expose a method in the VO

One solution would be to create a method in the VO and expose this method in the client interface of the VO. Then this method is visible in the binding layer and you can use call the method instead of using executeWithParams.

This works OK, but if a developer uses the executeWithParams method, you’ll still don’t get the right result.

Change the behavior of the executeWithParams method

I looked for a direct hook into the executeWithParams method but did not find one 😦

However, it turned out that the executeWithParam method calls the executeQuery method of the VO. At this point, the parameters are all set. This is done in the background via the VariableManager used in VOs to keep track of the bind parameters and their different type. There are where clause parameters and parameters used in view criteria. The latter are handled differently but this is not essential for this solution. All we need to know is that the parameters are correctly set when the executeQuery method is called.

The solution is to overwrite the executeQuery method of the view object (or use a base class) and check the parameters before executing the query.

Implementing the solution

In an earlier blog “Dump VO query and it’s parameter with their values” I showed how to get to the parameters defined for a VO and dump their values. Instead of writing the values to the log file, we look for the parameter, change the value, if one is given and then execute the query with the now converted parameter.

I use reflection to check if a setter method for a parameter is defined in the VO. If this is the case, I call the setter with the value set by the user. This way the setter is called when the query is called via the executeWithParams method. The code to change the parameter has only to be written once in the setter.

Below is the code:

    @Override
    public void executeQuery() {
        _logger.info("executeQuery");
        transformHistoryParameter();
        dumpQueryAndParameters();
        super.executeQuery();
    }

    private void transformHistoryParameter() {
        VariableValueManager vm = ensureVariableManager();
        Variable[] variables = vm.getVariables();
        // check each parameter for this query
        for (Variable var : variables) {
            String varName = var.getName();
            try {
                String mName = "set" + varName;
                Class mvarType = var.getJavaType();
                Method m = this.getClass().getMethod(mName, new Class[] { mvarType });
                // check if method is a setter method
                if (isSetter(m)) {
                    Object val = vm.getVariableValue(var);
                    m.invoke(this, val);
                }
            } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
                // nothing to do if there is no setter defined
                return;
            } catch (IllegalAccessException | InvocationTargetException e) {
                // nothing to do if there is no setter defined
                return;
            }
        }
    }

    public boolean isGetter(Method method) {
        if (!method.getName().startsWith("get")) {
            return false;
        }
        if (method.getParameterTypes().length != 0) {
            return false;
        }
        if (void.class.equals(method.getReturnType())) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    public boolean isSetter(Method method) {
        if (!method.getName().startsWith("set")) {
            return false;
        }
        if (method.getParameterTypes().length != 1) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    public void dumpQueryAndParameters() {
        // get the query in it's current state
        String lQuery = getQuery();
        // Dump query
        _logger.info("---query--- " + lQuery);
        //get Valriables
        AttributeList attributeList = getNamedWhereClauseParams();
        String[] attributeNames = attributeList.getAttributeNames();
        if (attributeNames == null || attributeNames.length == 0) {
            _logger.info("--- No variables found");
        } else {
            _logger.info("---Variables:");
            for (int ii = 0; ii < attributeNames.length; ii++) {
                Object lObject = attributeList.getAttribute(ii);
                _logger.info("  --- Name: " + attributeNames[ii] + " Value: " +
                             (lObject != null ? lObject.toString() : "null"));
            }
        }
    }

Sample

The sample to see the code at work can be downloaded from GitHub BlogExecuteWithParamsProblem

It was implemented using JDeveloper 12.2.1.3 and the HR DB schema.

To make it easy, I used the HR DB schema and built a query on the EMPLOYEES table:

A forth bind variable is introduced in a view criteria

The transformation uses the pMail bind parameter and makes it uppercase.

    /**
     * Returns the bind variable value for pMail.
     * @return bind variable value for pMail
     */
    public String getpMail() {
        String val = (String) getNamedWhereClauseParam("pMail");
        _logger.info("value: " + val);
        return val;
    }

    /**
     * Sets <code>value</code> for bind variable pMail.
     * @param value value to bind as pMail
     */
    public void setpMail(String value) {
        _logger.info("value:" + value);
        String newVal = value;
        if (value != null) {
            newVal = value.toUpperCase();
            _logger.info("Value transformed to " + newVal);
        }
        setNamedWhereClauseParam("pMail", newVal);
    }

I know that it would be easy to without this code by just setting the ‘ignore case’ flag when defining the query, but this is just a sample of a change of a parameter.

The data model in the application module looks like

As you see I added a second instance of the EmployeesView and attached the view criteria to this instance. Running the application module in the tester (see JDeveloper & ADF: Use the Application Module Tester (BC4J Tester) to Test all your BusinessLogic)

We get

And the following log

Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl executeQuery
INFO: executeQuery
Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl setpMail
INFO: value:ski
Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl setpMail
INFO: Value transformed to SKI

Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl setpName
INFO: value: null
Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl setpDate
INFO: value: null
Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl dumpQueryAndParameters
INFO: —query— SELECT Employees.EMPLOYEE_ID, Employees.FIRST_NAME, Employees.LAST_NAME, Employees.EMAIL, Employees.PHONE_NUMBER, Employees.HIRE_DATE, Employees.JOB_ID, Employees.SALARY, Employees.COMMISSION_PCT, Employees.MANAGER_ID, Employees.DEPARTMENT_ID FROM EMPLOYEES Employees WHERE ( ( ( ( Employees.LAST_NAME LIKE ( :pName || ‘%’) ) OR ( :pName IS NULL ) ) AND ( ( Employees.EMAIL LIKE ( :pMail || ‘%’) ) OR ( :pMail IS NULL ) ) AND ( ( Employees.HIRE_DATE >= :pDate ) OR ( :pDate IS NULL ) ) ) )
Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl dumpQueryAndParameters
INFO: —Variables:
Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl dumpQueryAndParameters
INFO: — Name: pMail Value: SK
I
Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl dumpQueryAndParameters
INFO: — Name: pName Value: null
Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl dumpQueryAndParameters
INFO: — Name: pDate Value: null
Feb 08, 2019 3:05:38 PM de.hahn.blog.execwithparams.model.EmployeesViewImpl dumpQueryAndParameters
INFO: — Name: pSalary Value: null

We see, that executeQuery() is called, then setpMail is called and the value given in the UI is converted to uppercase. In the dump of the query, we see that the uppercase parameter is used for the query.

The same works with the other view object in the application module. Just try it out yourself. The sample has a small UI project allowing you to test it in the browser too.

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JDev: af:panelList without bullet if no link is given

We all know that ADF components are well defined and have a lot of functions. However, what if we want to use a component but don’t like what we get out of the box from it?

The answer is easy most of the times as we can change the look of the component or its behavior to our needs. Sometimes the answer is not as straightforward, but still easy, as in this

Use Case

A user wants to have an af:panelList, showing bullets in front of each item in the list. The Items should be links to other pages. The problem part is that some of the links in the list should not be visible all the time. E.g. a user might not have to needed access right to some of the links.

Problem

When we use an af:panelList as is, we get the following look

From this setup

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<f:view xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">
    <af:document title="panelList.jsf" id="d1">
        <af:form id="f1">
            <af:panelGridLayout id="pgl1">
                <af:gridRow height="50px" id="gr1">
                    <af:gridCell width="100%" halign="stretch" valign="stretch" id="gc1">
                        <!-- Header -->
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
                <af:gridRow height="100%" id="gr2">
                    <af:gridCell width="100%" halign="stretch" valign="stretch" id="gc2">
                        <af:panelList rows="5"> 
                            <af:link text="link 1" id="l1" destination="http://www.oracle.com"/>
                            <af:link text="link 2" id="l2" destination="http://www.oracle.com"/>
                            <af:link text="link 3" id="l3" destination="http://www.oracle.com"/>
                            <af:link text="link 4" id="l4" destination="http://www.oracle.com"/>
                        </af:panelList>
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
            </af:panelGridLayout>
        </af:form>
    </af:document>
</f:view>

Setting e.g. link 3 to not visible we get

So, seeing the bullet in front of the link isn’t what we are looking for. Using the rendered property instead of the visible property will give us

But the problem now is that the link can’t be simply brought back to the page without a full page refresh. That is one of the disadvantages of using the rendered property. Once a component is not rendered, you need to do a full page refresh to get it back. A partial page refresh won’t work.

If you want to show some white space for the missing ‘link 3’ you can’t use the rendered property at all. Putting a spacer between ‘link 2’ and ‘link 4’ you end up with the same image as you get for using the visible property.

Solution

One solution is to omit the bullet in front of the links, which is automatically generated by the component. If there is no bullet, we’ll get

So, still not what we really want.

The final part is how to get the bullet back in front of the visible links. Easy, as the af:link component has an icon property where can specify an image we use as a bullet. The final page looks like

You can use any other image as an icon to show in front of the link. The missing part is how we got rid of the original bullet from the af:panelList. Simply by using a style class, we defined in a skin file and applying it to the af:panelList

@charset "UTF-8";
/**ADFFaces_Skin_File / DO NOT REMOVE**/
@namespace af "http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich";
@namespace dvt "http://xmlns.oracle.com/dss/adf/faces";

.ivi af|panelList {
    list-style-type: none; 
}

.ivi af|panelList::item {
    list-style-type: none; 
}

And using this page

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<!DOCTYPE html>
<f:view xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">
    <af:document title="panelList.jsf" id="d1">
        <af:form id="f1">
            <af:panelGridLayout id="pgl1">
                <af:gridRow height="50px" id="gr1">
                    <af:gridCell width="100%" halign="stretch" valign="stretch" id="gc1">
                        <af:outputText value="PanelList with Bullet" id="ot1" inlineStyle="font-size:x-large;"/>
                        <!-- Header -->
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
                <af:gridRow height="100%" id="gr2">
                    <af:gridCell width="100%" halign="stretch" valign="stretch" id="gc2">
                        <af:panelList rows="5" styleClass="ivi"> 
                            <af:link text="link 1" id="l1" destination="http://www.oracle.com"
                                     icon="/images/bullet.png"/>
                            <af:link text="link 2" id="l2" destination="http://www.oracle.com"
                                     icon="/images/bullet.png"/>
                            <af:spacer width="10" height="10" id="s1"/>
                            <af:link text="link 3" visible="false" id="l3" destination="http://www.oracle.com"
                                     icon="/images/bullet.png"/>
                            <af:link text="link 4" id="l4" destination="http://www.oracle.com"
                                     icon="/images/bullet.png"/>
                        </af:panelList>
                    </af:gridCell>
                </af:gridRow>
            </af:panelGridLayout>
        </af:form>
    </af:document>
</f:view>

You can download the sample which was built using JDev 12.2.1.3 from GitHub BlogPanelList. The sample doesn’t need any DB connection or model project.

JDeveloper 12.2.1.3: REST POST Sample

Lately, I got a request to build a REST POST sample using an ADF REST DataControl. Well, here we go.

First of all, we need a REST API which allows us to create data as this will be translated to REST POST call. I deliberately don’t want to use an ADF based REST service as there are samples available for this.

Looking for free REST API services which allow creating data I found “reqres’ (http://reqres.in), a free ‘hosted REST-API ready to respond to your AJAX requests’. This service can be used to test REST calls using any verb you like. It promises to be online 24/7.

Let’s start by creating a new ADF Web Application. If we would only test the REST service we could have created a custom application, but I want to show the viewController part too, so the ADF Web Application is just fine.

I don’t show how to do this here as you can see it done here ‘Why and how to write reproducible test cases’

As we don’t use the ADFModel project you can delete this empty project if you like. After creating the initial workspace, we create a new project from the gallery as a ‘Custom Project’

I named the new project ‘BRPWebService’, but you can name the project anything you like. Inside the new project we new create a ‘Web Service Data Control (SOAP/REST)’:

After selecting this, a wizard will ask which kind of ‘Web Service Data Control’ we like to create. We choose REST and now have to specify the base URL to the REST service API.

We skip the next page as there is no OWSM Policy needed to access the REST API

In step 3 we define the path we want to use after the base URL. From the web page of the service, we see a bunch of possible API endpoints.

For this test, we use the ‘api/users’ path. The whole URL now is ‘http://reqres.in/api/users’. To test the creation of data we use the POST verb, so we select the POST. To make sure the service is functional, we add the GET verb too.

After naming the methods getUsers for the GET and createUser for the POST, we need to give the wizard info about the parameters the API expects and the response we get when the call is successful. When we click on the GET verb on the web page, we get all the info we need.

All JSON code samples are available from the web page or from this blog in the appendix

We copy the response from the web page and pate it o the ‘Response Sample’ field and create a parameter ‘page’ in the parameter section of the next wizard step.

The same we do for the createUser method. Here we have to copy the request parameter JSON and the response JSON from the web page.

On the next page, we test the Web Service Data Control

This completes the creation process. We can now run the Datacontrol from inside JDeveloper by right-clicking the data control and choosing ‘Run’

Testing the getUsers method with the parameter set to 2 we receive the right answer

Now, let’s try the POST verb by trying out the createUser method. As a parameter, we pass some JSON and after executing the method we get a JSON part back telling us the new Id of the user.

Everything works. Please remember that we only use a ‘fake’ service which accepts our JSON, but will not add any data!

Sample Application

For the fun of it, I developed a ViewControler which uses the REST Data Control. It allows to ask for users by providing a page to load, or you can test the POST verb to create a ‘fake’ new user.

The final application can be downloaded from GitHub BlogRestPost. It was built using JDeveloper 12.2.1.3 without a DB connection.

After starting the app we see this UI

The service allows getting users in page mode, three users per page. So, enter 3 into the ‘Page’ filed and we get

Now, filling ‘name’ and ‘job’ field and clicking the createUser button we get

The service returns a new user with a new ID and the timestamp when the user was created.

Appendix

JSON reponse for GET api/users?page=2

{
    "page": 2,
    "per_page": 3,
    "total": 12,
    "total_pages": 4,
    "data": [
        {
            "id": 4,
            "first_name": "Eve",
            "last_name": "Holt",
            "avatar": "https://s3.amazonaws.com/uifaces/faces/twitter/marcoramires/128.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": 5,
            "first_name": "Charles",
            "last_name": "Morris",
            "avatar": "https://s3.amazonaws.com/uifaces/faces/twitter/stephenmoon/128.jpg"
        },
        {
            "id": 6,
            "first_name": "Tracey",
            "last_name": "Ramos",
            "avatar": "https://s3.amazonaws.com/uifaces/faces/twitter/bigmancho/128.jpg"
        }
    ]
}

JSON payload and response for POST api/create

Payload
{
    "name": "morpheus",
    "job": "leader"
}

Reponse
{
    "name": "morpheus",
    "job": "leader",
    "id": "783",
    "createdAt": "2018-11-19T21:42:47.556Z"
}

Using External REST Services with JDeveloper Part 3

In this blog we look how we can use an external REST service with JDev 12.2.1.2. To make things more interesting we don’t use an ADF based REST service and we look how to get nested data into the UI.

For this sample we like to create an application which allows to search for music tracks and show the results in a table or listview. To get the music data we use a REST service and to display the data we use ADF faces application.

In Part 1 we create the application and the project for the REST Data Control. In Part 2 we started creating the UI using the REST Data Control. In this final part we are enhancing the UI by using nested data from the REST Web Service and add this as column to the search result table. Before we start we look at the use case again.

Use Case

Before we begin implementing something which uses the external REST service we have to think about the use case. We like to implement a music title search using the external MusicBrainz REST service. A user should be able to enter a music title or part of a music title and as a result of the search she/he should get a list of titles, the artist or artists, the album and an id.

 

Handling nested Data

The use case demands that we add the artist and the album the music track is on to the same table. A look at the table in it’s current layout, make this understandable.

First of all we need to identify the dat a we want to add to the table in the response we get from the service.

Let’s investigate the JSON data, part of it, we get from the service for the search for the track ‘yesterday’


 

{
   "created": "2017-08-02T12:42:48.815Z",
   "count": 5985,
   "offset": 0,
   "recordings": [
       {
           "id": "465ad10d-97c9-4cfd-abd3-b765b0924e0b",
           "score": "100",
           "title": "Yesterday",
           "length": 243560,
           "video": null,
           "artist-credit": [
               {
                   "artist": {
                       "id": "351d8bdf-33a1-45e2-8c04-c85fad20da55",
                       "name": "Sarah Vaughan",
                       "sort-name": "Vaughan, Sarah",
                       "aliases": [
                           {
                               "sort-name": "Sarah Vahghan",
                               "name": "Sarah Vahghan",
                               "locale": null,
                               "type": null,
                               "primary": null,
                               "begin-date": null,
                               "end-date": null
                           },
...
                       ]
                   }
               }
           ],
           "releases": [
               {
                   "id": "f088ce44-62fb-4c68-a1e3-e2975eb87f52",
                   "title": "Songs of the Beatles",
                   "status": "Official",
                   "release-group": {
                       "id": "5e4838fa-07f1-3b93-8c9d-e7107774108b",
                       "primary-type": "Album"
                   },
                   "country": "US",

I marked the info ne need in blue in the data above. We see that the artist name is inside a list of name ‘artist_credit’ and that there can be multiple artists inside the ‘artist_credit’. This is a typical master/detail relationship.

The same is true for the album name which is an attribute inside a list of ‘releases’. The big question now is how do we get the nested data into the table as column.

When we expand the MusicBrainz Data Control we see the same structure we saw in the JSON data

So, the data is there, we only need to get to it. The data is structured like a tree and ADF is capable of accessing data in a tree structure (e.g. using an af:tree component). However, we like to use a simple table and don’t want to use a af:tree or af:treeTable. To get to the data, we first have to add the nested structure to the recordings binding we already use to display the current two columns of the table.

Right now we see the first level of the tree, the ‘recodrings’. Click the green ‘+’ sign to add the next level ‘artist_credit’

Add all attributes to the right side

As the artist name is still one level down, click the green ‘+’ sign again and add the ‘artist’ level

And shuffle the id and name attribute to the right side

Finnally we need to add the ‘releases’ level to get to the album name. For this select the ‘recordings’ level (the first) and click the green ‘+’ sign

And shuffle the id, title and track_count to the right side

Now all related data we need can be accessed via the ‘recordings’ binding.

We start with the artist column. Select the af:table in the structure window and open hte properties window

Click the green ‘+’ sign twice in the columns section to add two columns

Select the first added column (score in the image) and change the display label to ‘Artist’ and the component To Use’ to ‘ADF Output Text’. The second added column we change the display label to ‘Album’ and the ‘Component To Use’ again to ‘ADF Output Text’

We change the ‘Value Binding’ in the next step.

To get to the data for the artists we need to traverse two levels of sub rows. First level is the ‘artist_credit’, the second level is the artist itself. Here we have to keep in mind, that there can be more than one artist. In this case we have to join the names into one string for the table. As the ‘artist_credit’ itself can occur more than once, at least that’S what the data structure is telling us, we use an iterator to get the data.

The value property points to the current row and selects the ‘artist_creadit’. Each item we get from this iterator we access via the var property. So the item inside the iterator can be addressed as ‘artists’.

The artists can be one or more so we need another iterator to get to the artist data.

<af:iterator id="i2" value="#{artists.artist}" var="art" varStatus="artStat">

The value property for this iterator points to the artist we got from the outer iterator and is addressed as #{artists.artist}. To access attributes inside the artist data structure we use the var property and set it to ‘art’.

Now we have to somehow joint multiple artist names together if a track has more than one artist. The MusicBrainz Web Service helps us here by providing a ‘joinphrase’ which can be used to build one string for all artists. This ‘joinphrase’ can be .e.g a ‘&’ or a ‘,’. The full column code for the artist looks like

<af:iterator id="i2" value="#{artists.artist}" var="art" varStatus="artStat">

Here is some sample data for a search for the track ‘Something Stupid’ (to make it more readable I removed some attributes

"recordings": [
 {
  "title": "Something Stupid",
  "artist-credit": [
   {
    "joinphrase": " duet with ",
    "artist": {
     "name": "The Mavericks",
    }
   },
   {
    "joinphrase": " & ",
    "artist": {
     "name": "Raul Malo",
    }
   },
   {
    "artist": {
     "name": "Trisha Yearwood",
    }
   }
 ]

This data will be translated into the artist: “The Mavericks duet with Raul Malo & Trisha Yearwood”.

For the album column it’s easier. This too needs an iterator, but we don’t have to go down another level and we don’T have to join the data we get from the iterator. The column code for the album looks like

<af:iterator id="i1" value="#{row.artist_credit}" var="artists">
 <af:iterator id="i2" value="#{artists.artist}" var="art"
                    varStatus="artStat">
   <af:outputText value="#{art.name}#{artists.joinphrase}" id="ot5"/>
 </af:iterator>
</af:iterator>

The whole table for the search results look like

With this the page is ready and we can run the application. After start we see the page

Now entering a search term ‘something stupid’ into the search field will show

or trying the search with ‘dave’ will show

This concludes this mini series about how to use external REST Services and build an ADF UI from it.

The source code for this sample can be loaded from GitHub BlogUsingExternalREST. The sample was done using JDeveloper 12.2.1.2 and don’t use a DB.

Using External REST Services with JDeveloper (Part 2)

In this blog we look how we can use an external REST service with JDev 12.2.1.2. To make things more interesting we don’t use an ADF based REST service and we look how to get nested data into the UI.

For this sample we like to create an application which allows to search for music tracks and show the results in a table or listview. To get the music data we use a REST service and to display the data we use ADF faces application.

In Part 1 we create the application and the project for the REST Data Control. In Part 2 we start create the UI using the REST Data Control. Before we start we look at the use case again.

Use Case

Before we begin implementing something which uses the external REST service we have to think about the use case. We like to implement a music title search using the external MusicBrainz REST service. A user should be able to enter a music title or part of a music title and as a result of the search she/he should get a list of titles, the artist or artists, the album and an id.

Implementing the UI

In Part 1 we implemented the REST Data Control which we now use to build a small UI. Let’s look at the REST Web Service Data Control in the JDeveloper IDE

Above we see the data control ‘MusicBrainzJSONDC’ with it’s only resource recording, the input parameter names ‘query’ and the return data structure which was created using the sample JSON data we used when creating the REST Web Service Data Control.

When we query the resource we get back a complex data structure which give us information about how many results where found for the query and a list of ‘recordings’ which holds the artist names and the album names as ‘releases’.

To build the result table which should show the title id, the artist or artists and the album we have to go through all the nested data.

Setting up the search page

We start by adding a view the unbounded task flow adfc-config.xml which we name ‘MunicBrainz’ and create the page with a quick layout from the list

Make sure that you have selected to use ‘Facelets’! This will create a starter page with the layout selected. When the page is created it opens up in JDev like

We add an outputText component to the header and set the value to ‘MusicBrainz Test’

The resulting code looks like

For the layout we want to archive (search part and table to show the results) we need another grid row in the panelGridLayout. We drag a GridRow component from the ‘Component palette’ onto the panelGridLayout component in the structure window. You can use the source window too if you like. Dropping a new gridRow in the design isn’t recommended as it’s difficult to control the point where to insert the component.

Now we adjust the height of the rows and set the first row to 50 pixel, the second one to 100 pixel and leave the remaining height to the third gridRow:

Next we add the panelFormLayout holding the search field and the button to search for music tracks. For this we simply drag the ‘recording(String)’ operation from the MusicBrainzJSONDC data control onto the second grid row and drop it as ‘ADF Parameter Form’

we get a dialog showing us the methods parameter. Here we can bind the field to any other data field we like. However, in this case we leave it as is and just click OK

The framework wires everything up for us and we get the page as

Here we change the text on the button to ‘Search’

To see how things are wired up we look at the pagedef for the page

Here we see the method ‘recording’ and can expand it by clicking on the pencil icon

Where we see the details like where the parameter ‘query’ gets it’s value from (#{bindings.query.inputValue}). The ‘query’ binding is defined right above the recording method:

When we select the binding for ‘query’ wee see that the binding points to a variable defined in the pagedef (see Creating Variables and Attribute Bindings to Store Values Temporarily in the PageDef) which holds the value the user enters into the field. The recordings binding and the other stuff we talk about later.

Next up is creating the table with the results returned from the method call. For this we drag the recordings from the methodReturn binding onto the page and drop it as ADF Table into the third gridRow

To get the next dialog

Where we remove every attribute but the ‘id’ and the ‘title’ by selecting the rows and clicking the red ‘x’ icon. We set the row selection to single and make the table ‘read only’

The resulting page looks like

If we run the application now the UI comes up, but we’ll get an exception

Why’s that?

If we look into the servers log we see the error:-


<oracle.adf.view> <Utils> <buildFacesMessage> <ADF: Adding the following JSF error message: JBO-57001: Invocation of service URL used in connection failed with status code 400 Unable to parse search:tnum:.> 
oracle.adf.model.connection.rest.exception.RestConnectionException: JBO-57001: Invocation of service URL used in connection failed with status code 400 Unable to parse search:tnum:.
    at oracle.adf.model.connection.rest.RestConnection.getResponseCheckingStatus(RestConnection.java:783)
    at oracle.adf.model.connection.rest.RestConnection.getResponse(RestConnection.java:629)
    at oracle.adfinternal.model.adapter.ChildOperation.getJerseyResponse(ChildOperation.java:1167)
    at oracle.adfinternal.model.adapter.ChildOperation.makeServerCall(ChildOperation.java:977)
    at oracle.adfinternal.model.adapter.JSONChildOperation.invokeOperationInternal(ChildOperation.java:2056)
    at oracle.adfinternal.model.adapter.ChildOperation.invokeOperation(ChildOperation.java:542)
    at oracle.adf.model.adapter.rest.RestURLDataControl.invokeOperation(RestURLDataControl.java:247)
    at oracle.adf.model.bean.DCBeanDataControl.invokeMethod(DCBeanDataControl.java:512)
    at oracle.adf.model.binding.DCInvokeMethod.callMethod(DCInvokeMethod.java:269)
    at oracle.jbo.uicli.binding.JUCtrlActionBinding.doIt(JUCtrlActionBinding.java:1742)
    at oracle.adf.model.binding.DCDataControl.invokeOperation(DCDataControl.java:2371)
    at oracle.adf.model.bean.DCBeanDataControl.invokeOperation(DCBeanDataControl.java:628)
    at oracle.adf.model.adapter.AdapterDCService.invokeOperation(AdapterDCService.java:316)
    at oracle.jbo.uicli.binding.JUCtrlActionBinding.invoke(JUCtrlActionBinding.java:803)
    at oracle.jbo.uicli.binding.JUMethodIteratorDef$JUMethodIteratorBinding.invokeMethodAction(JUMethodIteratorDef.java:175)

 


Which doesn’t tell us more. What we see is that an ‘invokeMethod’ is the root cause. The reason is that when the pages loads, the iterators in the executable section of the pagedef are fired. As we saw we have two executables and those are giving us the errors.

As the field is empty the recordings method is called without a query parameter. If you mimic this in Postman with the query

http://musicbrainz.org/ws/2/recording/?fmt=json&query=

we get

Exactly the same error, only this time as html.

To solve this problem we have to avoid calling the service without a parameter. This can easily be archived by adding an expression to the executable RefreshCondition property

This we have to both executables in the pagedef. After that running the application will get us

 

This ends part 2 of this series, due to the length and the number of images in this post. The remaining part 3 will cover how to use the nested data and to add it to the search result table and provide the link to the sample application.

JDeveloper: How to setup and use a converter

JDeveloper: How to setup and use a converter

In this post I show how to setup the server side part of a converter and how to use it in an application. Converters can have a client side too and all af:converter do have one. For a nice sample on what you can do with client side converters see ADF: Smart Input Date Client Converter. The big difference is that the client side converter is done on the client side with JavaScript and no server round trip is done for the conversation.

Why are converters needed at all?

Sometimes the data you get from a source like the database table is not in a format you like to show to the user. Common cases are showing strings in special formatting, e.g. social security numbers or phone numbers. You can use converters to show the content of clob and blob columns in the UI too.

The ADF framework provided some converters out of the box:

These can be used without the need to program anything.

What is missing from the out of the box converters is one which can be used to format a string.

One thing to remember that the new format should only be used in the UI to show the data in a specific format. You normally don’t want to store it in this special format.

We create a converter which exchanges each uppercase character ‘B’ in a string with the string “-Z-”. The sample is not very useful, but it shows what can be done with converters.

Use Case

A string can contain any character. However when the string is shown on the UI there should be no ‘B’ visible. Instead of the ‘B’ we should show ‘-Z-’. This should only be done when the string is visible on the UI. When the string is stored in the db or some other place it should be stored with the ‘B’.

Implementation

I used JDev 11.1.1.7.0 for this sample, which is the oldest JDev version I have access to. The steps to create a converter should be almost equal in all versions, but I deliberately choose the oldest JDev I have so that other users with other version should have no problem migrating this sample to their version.

The final sample can be downloaded from GitHub at BlogConverterSample.

Model Project

We start by creating a fresh ADF Web Application. If you want a detailed description on how to do this, you can follow Writing Reproducible Test Cases: Why and How. For the model part I only use one DB table, the EMPLOYEES table. The resulting model project looks like

We don’t need to make any change to the generated project. This model project is only created to show that the converter works on data read from the DB table too.

ViewController Project

For users interested in more details about converters, please read the doc at http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E48682_01/web.1111/b31973/af_validate.htm#BABGIEDH. To start with the converter, we create a java class in the ViewController project and name it MyB2ZConverter.java. As package we choose ‘de.hahn.blog.convertersample.view.converter’

As the class will be a converter we have to implement the javax.faces.convert.Converter interface. For this you click on the green ‘+’ sign and can search for the right interface

This process will create the java class and two methods

These are the methods we have to implement for our use case. The first method ‘getAsObject’ is called when the data from the UI is send to the server for further processing. The ‘getAsString’ method is called when data from a storage (DB, bean property or pagedef variable) is going to be rendered to the UI.

As our use case is to exchange every “B” with the string “-Z-” we can implement the getAsString method easily by replacing every “B’ with “-Z-”. The method has three parameters, the current FacesContext which you can use to write messages, the UIComponent for which the converter is called and finally an Object representing the data which we want to convert. The result of the conversion must be a String. The resulting method look like

/** Method to get the string representation of hte object to use in the UI
* @param facesContext current facesContext
* @param uIComponent component which was used to deliver the data
* @param object data from storage to be converted
* @return sting to use for in the UI
*/
public String getAsString(FacesContext facesContext, UIComponent uIComponent, Object object) {
  if (object != null) {
    String ret = object.toString().replaceAll("B", "-Z-");
    return ret;
  } else {
    return null;
  }
}

After the check if the object to convert is null (in this case there is nothing to do), we use the String.replaceAll(…) method to search for ‘B’ and replace it with “-Z-”.

Keep in mind that the first parameter to the replaceAll method is a regular expression (see String.replaceAll(java.lang.String, java.lang.String)).

Now, if the data from the UI is send back to the model layer, it has to be converted back into the original format. So we have to do the conversion backwards by replacing all “-Z-” with “B” in the getAsObject(…) method:

/** Method which get the data from a uiComponent and should return it in the format we like to store in the DB (or elswhere)
* @param facesContext current facesContext
* @param uIComponent component which was used to deliver the data
* @param string data from the ui component
* @return object to use for further work (e.g. storage in the DB)
*/
public Object getAsObject(FacesContext facesContext, UIComponent uIComponent, String string) {
  if (string != null) {
    String ret = string.replaceAll("-Z-", "B");
    return ret;
  } else {
    return null;
  }
}

The result will be an Object which will be passed back to the model layer. If you don’t implement the getAsObject(…) method and just return the third parameter as resulting object, you would change every data in the back end to the new format. This may be your intention, but most often you don’t want to do this. It would mark every row of data dirty you have visited without any user interaction. This is because you pass different data back to the model than you read from it.

The last step to do is to register the custom converter in the faces-config.xml file of the ViewController project. Open the faces-config.xml file in JDev and select the ‘Converter’ tab

Click the green ‘+’ sign to get the an empty row in the converter section. Go to the property window and you see

Where we click on the ‘…’ button on the right end of the ‘Class’ field. We get the search for a class dialog where we look for the MyB2ZConverter class

Select the class and enter an ID fro the converter. This ID will be used in the UI to tell a component to use this converter.

Finally the converter section look like

UI Page

Now we can use the converter in a page or fragment. We start with a simple page where we define a inputText field and a button to submit the content of the field to see the converter working.

In the adfc-config.xml we add a JSPX page named ‘index’

And this page uses a quick layout as seen here

We add a title and the inputText field, a button to submit the data and two outputText fields to show what the converter has done to the data. The page layout looks like

or in code

If you like to copy the code use the following representation:

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<jsp:root xmlns:jsp="http://java.sun.com/JSP/Page" version="2.1" xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core" xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"
 xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich">
 <jsp:directive.page contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8"/>
 <f:view>
 <af:document id="d1">
 <af:form id="f1">
 <af:panelStretchLayout topHeight="50px" id="psl1">
 <f:facet name="top">
 <af:outputText value="Converter Sample" id="ot1" inlineStyle="font-size:x-large;"/>
 </f:facet>
 <f:facet name="center">
 <af:panelGroupLayout layout="scroll" xmlns:af="http://xmlns.oracle.com/adf/faces/rich" id="pgl1">
 <af:inputText label="Enter String" id="it1" value="#{bindings.myInput1.inputValue}">
 <f:converter converterId="B2ZConverter"/>
 </af:inputText>
 <af:commandButton text="refresh" id="cb1"/>
 <af:outputText value="current data: #{bindings.myInput1.inputValue}" id="ot2"/>
 <af:outputText value="current data with converter: #{bindings.myInput1.inputValue}" id="ot3">
 <f:converter converterId="B2ZConverter"/>
 </af:outputText>
 <af:commandButton text="Converter with DB Data" id="cb2" action="emp"/>
 </af:panelGroupLayout>
 <!-- id="af_one_column_header_stretched" -->
 </f:facet>
 </af:panelStretchLayout>
 </af:form>
 </af:document>
 </f:view>
</jsp:root>

Hint: you might notice another component, a button which is later used to navigate to a second page. This is described later.

For the inputText field we need to store the data a user enters. For this we can either use a DB table, a bean property or a pagedef variable. We use a pagedef variable (more on see see Creating Variables and Attribute Bindings to Store Values Temporarily in the PageDef) which we bind to the value property of the inputText component (value=”#{bindings.myInput1.inputValue}”). The converter is setup by adding an f:converter tag like

<af:inputText label="Enter String" id="it1" value="#{bindings.myInput1.inputValue}">
  <f:converter converterId="B2ZConverter"/>
</af:inputText>

The converterId points to the ID defined in the faces-config.xml file. Running the page will show

Enter ‘Hello’ into the field and clicking outside the field (so that it looses the focus) will show

As we see, the two outputText fields don’t show anything as the data in not submitted jet. Clicking the ‘refresh’ button submits the data and the converter goes to action

Well, as the input did not have any ‘B’ nothing changes. So lets us add another word ‘Beta’ and click outside the inputText

As we did not submit the data to the server, we still see ‘Hello Beta’ and the outputText fields show ‘Hello’ both. Now click the ‘refresh’ button to get

The inputText has changed to the new format where the “B” is exchanged with the “-Z-”, however the outputtext ‘current data’ still shows the ‘Hello Beta’. The reason for this is that the data send to the binding layer was converted back using the getAsObject(…) method which exchanged the “-Z-” with “B”.

This implements the use case described at the beginning.

Now, to show that the same converter works with data from a DB table as well we add another two pages to the adfc-config.xml. One showing the employees in a read only table with a link on the employeeId which navigates to the employee details in a form.

The navigation to the second use case is done with the button mentioned earlier (‘Converter with DB data’)

Clicking on the button will show a table with employees where the EMail column was used to add the converter

The column tag looks like

<af:column sortProperty="#{bindings.EmployeesView1.hints.Email.name}" filterable="true" sortable="true"
    headerText="#{bindings.EmployeesView1.hints.Email.label}" id="c3">
  <af:outputText value="#{row.Email}" id="ot5">
    <f:converter converterId="B2ZConverter"/>
  </af:outputText>
</af:column>

Like with the inputText we just add a f:converter tag with the right ID “B2ZConverter”. With this use case we see why the getAsObject(…) method should undo the formatting. You don’t want to store the Email like this. You only want to show it this way, but not overwrite the correct Email fro the employee. You can check the DB data and see that the Email is still stored with the “B” and not the “-Z-”

To verify this we can click the link in the first column to goto the detail page of the selected employee

Again, we see the ‘Email’ in the new format and the original data ‘NO CONVERTER Email’ in the normal data. The tags used for this are

  <af:inputText value="#{bindings.Email.inputValue}" label="#{bindings.Email.hints.label}" required="#{bindings.Email.hints.mandatory}"
      columns="#{bindings.Email.hints.displayWidth}" maximumLength="#{bindings.Email.hints.precision}"
      shortDesc="#{bindings.Email.hints.tooltip}" id="it1">
    <f:validator binding="#{bindings.Email.validator}"/>
    <f:converter converterId="B2ZConverter"/>
  </af:inputText>
  <af:panelLabelAndMessage label="NO CONVERTER #{bindings.Email.hints.label}" id="plam1">
    <af:outputText value="#{bindings.Email.inputValue}" id="ot2"/>
  </af:panelLabelAndMessage>

When using the binding for the Email without the converter we see the data as it’s stored in the DB. Using the converter we see the converted data.

The sample was build with JDeveloper 11.1.1.17.0 using the HR DB schema. You can download the sample from GitHub BlogConverterSample.zip

DOAG DevCamp2016: Oracle Development Cloud Service Hands On (Part 2)

In part 1 of this series we talked about the Oracle Development Cloud Service (DCS) in general terms and what we plan to do. This part describes the migration of an application developed for an earlier version of JDeveloper to version 12.1.3 and how to move it into the cloud.

As a test case we use the sample application provided by the Rapid Development Kit which shows a sample on how to easily develop modern, scalable applications using the Alta UI. The image below shows the landing page of the application with the splash screen. The running application can be seen at http://140.86.8.75/AppsCloudUIKit/faces/Welcome

In Part 1 we already downloaded the source of the application, created the DCS project, assigned users to the project and initialized the GIT repository for the application in the DCS. The next step is to migrate the application which was designed using JDeveloper 11.1.1.9.0 to JDeveloper version 12.1.3 which we use in the DCS.

Before we start we checkout a new branch named ‘develop’ from the GTI repository. This allows us to work outside the ‘master’ branch. When we finished the migration we can merge the changes back to the master. This resembles the GIT Flow pattern (see ‘The Git Experience (Part 4)‘).

Migrating is as simple as to open the project in your local JDeveloper 12.1.3 and let JDeveloper do an automatic migration. There are some things which have to be changed in the sources as JDeveloper can’t do them automatically.

  1. We check the libraries used in each of the projects of the AppsCloudUIKit workspace. Make sure that there are no red marked libraries as this would mean that the library is not available in the current defined libraries. If we see one of those (e.g. JSF1.2 which is JSF2.1 in 12.1.3) we need to find an equivalent library for 12.1.3 and choose this instead.
  2. We compile each project and correct any errors we find in the compile window. There are some warnings which we let go for the moment. They tell us that the UI uses some tags or components which have been deprecated in JDeveloper 12.1.3. The components are still available but we should exchange them with the new components in the future. When we compile the projects we have to follow a specific order, the dependency of the project. There is a common project ‘UIKitCommon’ which is used in all other projects. This project holds the foundation of the application. Once the project compiles we have to create an adfLibrary from it which is used in the other projects. For this we right click on the project and select ‘Deploy’->’adflibUIKitCommon…’ and follow the instructions.
  3. We need to setup the data used for the application. The application doesn’t use a DB in this version. All data is created and served via POJO Java classes. All of them reside in the ‘DemoData’ project. We compile this project and create an ADF library from it like we did for the ‘UIKitCommon’ project.
  4. We compile and deploy (to adfLibrary) the other projects in this order: ‘DemoCRM’, ‘DemoHCM’, ‘DemoFIN’ and finally ‘DemoMaster’. The ‘DemoMaster’ project create an EAR File which can be deployed to a standalone server.

After this we can run the application in our local server integrated in JDeveloper and see if it works (see the image above). Once this is verified we save all changes in the GIT repository and push them to the cloud based remote GIT Repository. This is like working with any other remote GIT repository, no difference in usage. After this the landing page of the DCS project shows the trail of work as in the image below.

Using the collaboration features

One really nice thing about the DCS is the integrated collaboration features like a wiki page, an issue tracker like Jira and an agile board where we can plan sprints to track the progress of the project.

We create a wiki page to collect all decisions made during development and generating documentation this way. This will help members to understand the project and how they are supposed to work with the project. New members added to the project at a later point in time can use this wiki to understand the project and how to work with the team.

The image below show the start wiki page of the project

and add some basic information about the project. Later we add more info about who we changed the project and how to setup the build system.

The wiki supports cascading pages too. We add a page describing the build system to the project. This allows other team members to efficiently use the build system on the DCS. We talk about details of the build system and how to use it in the next part.

Agile Development

The DCS supports agile development. The tab ‘Agile’ opens a sprint planning view to the project. This is a very neat feature. Teams can use this to plan their tasks and track their progress. Here we can create issues (tasks, feature or issues) which first end up in the bag log. We can create sprints and assign the issues to sprints.

We can work like in e.g. Jira, we drag issues from the backlog to the sprint

to add the issue to the sprint

If you like you can change the agile board, e.g. add progress states

Finally we can start the sprint by defining the start and end date. Once a sprint is started we can look at the active sprint to see the tasks in their different states. This view allows drag & drop to make it easy to change the status of a task.

Once all tasks are finished we can complete the sprint.

A look at the ‘Issues’ tab shows the finished work.

All this works out of the box. As a teaser I added a couple of images from the DCS team feature when they are integrated in JDeveloper 12.2.1

When the DCS supports JDeveloper 12.2.1 the integration to the agile board and issue tracker is as simple as logging into the DCS. No hassle setting up a team server and all other needed software and their adapters.

This concludes the second part of the series. The next part reveals details about the build system.

Fasten your seat belts: Flying the Oracle Development Cloud Service (4 – In Flight 1)

In the last part of the series Fasten your seat belts: Flying the Oracle Development Cloud Service (3 – Take Off – ROTATE) we finished the work on the first cloud workspace, a utility project holding framework extension classes we use in the upcoming development. We created a branch to add the build system we can use in the cloud as well as on the developer’s machine.
The developer checked in all his/her changes, but did not merge the branch back into the mainline development (master). This part describes how this action, called a merge request, is done. This action can be used as a quality gate to review the code the developer has build.
After logging into the Oracle Developer Cloud as developer we select the ‘Merge Requests’ tab of the project

Merge Requests

Merge Requests


where we create a new request by clicking on the ‘New Request’ button. In the next dialog we fill in the needed data
Create Merge Request dialog

Create Merge Request dialog


The target branch is the branch we like the feature branch to be merged into, in our case it’s the branch called ‘master’. If you have other branches you like to merge you can do this too and later merge the whole merged feature branches back into the master branch. The ‘review Branch’ is the branch we want the review on, in our case the ‘feature-setup-build’ branch. In the ‘reviews’ field we must add at at least one member of the team, but can add multiple members if we like. Each of the reviewers then gets a notification via e-mail that a review is waiting.

The developer can only wait now for the action of the reviewers. Sure he can do something else like start another task for the project 🙂

The mails give some basic information about the request and the links to quickly access the cloud. After logging into the Cloud as reviewer the same ‘Merge Requests’ looks like

As we see, there now are the ‘Approve’ and ‘Reject’ buttons available for the Reviewer.
The reviewer should look at the changes made in the branch e.g. by looking at the commits for it.
Commits of the feature branch

Commits of the feature branch


As we don’t know what these files are doing, we reject the merge request

This will notify the developer who can and should act on the comment.

In this case the files are obsolete and can be deleted from the feature branch before merging (by the developer).

After changing the merge request by adding a hint that we delete the obsolete files, the reviewer again get some e-mails notifying him about this change.
Looking at the request after login, the reviewer approves the request and merges the branch into the master branch.

If we now look at the master branch we see the build files as part of the master branch.

One final thing to do is to switch the build system configuration from the feature branch to the master branch. When we started working on the feature we set up the build system to use the feature-setup-build branch. We now switch the build setup to use hte master branch.

This concludes this part of the series. Next we build a simple ‘normal’ ADF application in the cloud, applying what we have learned so far.

Fasten your seat belts: Flying the Oracle Development Cloud Service (3 – Take Off – ROTATE)

The last part of the series 3 – Take Off – V1 we finished when we could build hte application using ANT on the local machine. In this part we are going to try this on the Oracle Developer Cloud. Finally we should see how Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery works in the cloud.

Alt NOTE
I created a fresh set of ANT build scripts named ‘buildlocal.xml’ and ‘buildlocal.properties’ from the project to demonstrate the process. The original ones name ‘build.xml’ and ‘build.properties’ are the final result which I didn’t want to revert. So when you create the ANT scripts yourself you can user the default names ‘build.xml’ and ‘build.properties’. When I talk about build files I now mean the ones named ‘buildlocal.*’.

Demo Build Files

Demo Build Files


For the same reason we create a new build job in the cloud names ADFTestBuild to show the steps to take. The final build job is named ADFCommunuityFrkExt.
Demo Build Job

Demo Build Job

We pushed the files local build files already to the remote repository. Let’s run the build on the could. First we log into the Oracle Developer Cloud as team member and switch to the build tab and create a new build job (ADFTestBuild)


Note that we use JDK 7 to build the project. The Oracle Developer Cloud offers JDK 6-8 to work with. As we use JDev 12.1.3 we use JDK 7
JDK's available

JDK’s available


In the Source Code Management section we select the repository and branch to use for this job. The advanced section can be left blank as it’s filled by the system when you save the job. There are more advanced option you can set but they are not part of this post. All we nach to remember

Alt NOTE
Builds are dependent on ONE branch

Alt NOTE
The Build Trigger defines that each minute the CI system checks the SCM if something has changed. If yes, it schedules to execute the build job.

When we are finished with the feature we have to change the build job or to create a new one which uses the master or default branch to build on. In our situation where we implement the CI we set the branch to the one we are working on named ‘feature-setup-build’.

After saving the new job we can start it by clicking on the ‘Run Now’ button


Hm, the build did not work as it did on the local machine. This is shown by the icon in the first column of the job history table. To find out what went wrong we look at the output of the build by clicking on the ‘console’ button in the last column of hte table
Build output

Build output


In the first marked section we see the build file ‘buildlocal.xml’ which was used and in the second marked section the error message. It looks liek the build job can’t find the task ‘OJDeployAntTask’. A look into the buildlocal.xml file at line 40 reveals

   <taskdef name="ojdeploy" classname="oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.ant.OJDeployAntTask" uri="oraclelib:OJDeployAntTask"
             classpath="${oracle.jdeveloper.ant.library}"/>

where line 40 is the classpath in the above listing. This means that the variable “${oracle.jdeveloper.ant.library}” is not found. A look into the Oracle Developer Cloud at Developing Oracle ADF Applications with Oracle Developer Cloud Service give the needed information. We have to alter the build files
1. add a line

<property environment="env"/>

to the build.xml file before loading the build.properties
2. change the build.properties file to use information from the now loaded environemnt
The second part is a bit confusing. From the link above we learn to set a variable as
oracle.home=${env.ORACLE_HOME}
which is misleading a bit. The problem is that the developer cloud offers two environments to the user. One for 11g and one for 12c. As we use the one for 12c we have to use a different setup which can be found in the docs too at a different location Using Hudson Environment Variables. The second link tells us to use
oracle.home=${env.ORACLE_HOME12C3}

Alt NOTE
Add property environment="env" to your build.xml to load the environment of the server
Alt NOTE
Add
oracle.home=${env.ORACLE_HOME_12C3}
oracle.commons=${env.MIDDLEWARE_HOME_12C3}/oracle_common
middleware.home=${env.MIDDLEWARE_HOME_12C3}
install.dir=${env.ORACLE_HOME_12C3}
to the build.properties file to make use of hte servers environment.

With this info we can make the needed changes. The resulting build.properties is

#Fri Jul 24 15:06:08 CEST 2015
#Change the next three properties to match your projects names
workspace.name=ADFCommunityFrkExt
workspace=${env.WORKSPACE}
project.viewcontroller.name=FrkExtModel
project.deploy.folder=deploy
oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.profile.name=adflibADFCommunityFrkExt
output.dir=classes

# Don't change anything below!
oracle.home=${env.ORACLE_HOME_12C3}
oracle.commons=${env.MIDDLEWARE_HOME_12C3}/oracle_common
middleware.home=${env.MIDDLEWARE_HOME_12C3}
install.dir=${env.ORACLE_HOME_12C3}

#Flags
javac.deprecation=off
javac.nowarn=off
java.debug=on

project.workspace.file=${workspace.name}.jws
oracle.jdeveloper.ant.library=${oracle.home}/jdev/lib/ant-jdeveloper.jar
oracle.jdeveloper.workspace.path=${workspace}/${workspace.name}.jws
oracle.jdeveloper.project.name=${project.viewcontroller.name}
oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.dir=${workspace}/${project.deploy.folder}
oracle.jdeveloper.ojdeploy.path=${env.ORACLE_HOME_12C3}/jdev/bin/ojdeploy${env.EXEC_SUFFIX}
oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.outputfile=${workspace}/${project.deploy.folder}/${oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.profile.name}

and the build.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<!--Ant buildfile generated by Oracle JDeveloper-->
<!--Generated Aug 22, 2015 3:15:37 PM-->
<project xmlns="antlib:org.apache.tools.ant" name="FrkExtModel" default="all" basedir=".">
  <property environment="env"/>
  <property file="build.properties"/>
  <path id="library.ADF.Model.Runtime">
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.idm_12.1.3/identitystore.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.model_12.1.3/adfm.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/groovy-all-2.1.6.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.model_12.1.3/adftransactionsdt.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.view_12.1.3/adf-dt-at-rt.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.model_12.1.3/adfdt_common.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.model_12.1.3/adflibrary.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.xdk_12.1.3/xmlparserv2.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.model_12.1.3/db-ca.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.model_12.1.3/jdev-cm.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.ldap_12.1.3/ojmisc.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.share_12.1.3/commons-el.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.share_12.1.3/jsp-el-api.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.share_12.1.3/oracle-el.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.security_12.1.3/adf-share-security.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/oracle.adf.security_12.1.3/adf-controller-security.jar"/>
    <pathelement location="${oracle.commons}/modules/javax.mail_2.0.0.0_1-4-4.jar"/>
  </path>
  <path id="classpath">
    <path refid="library.ADF.Model.Runtime"/>
  </path>
  <target name="init">
    <tstamp/>
    <mkdir dir="${output.dir}"/>
  </target>
  <target name="info">
    <echo level="info">build: env.ORACLE_HOME=${env.ORACLE_HOME_12C3}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: env.WORKSPACE=${env.WORKSPACE}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: workspace=${workspace}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: install.dir=${env.ORACLE_HOME_12C3}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: oracle.commons=${oracle.commons}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: oracle.jdeveloper.ant.library=${oracle.jdeveloper.ant.library}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: oracle.jdeveloper.ojdeploy.path=${oracle.jdeveloper.ojdeploy.path}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.dir=${oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.dir}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.profile.name=${oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.profile.name}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: oracle.jdeveloper.workspace.path=${oracle.jdeveloper.workspace.path}</echo>
    <echo level="info">build: oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.outputfile=${oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.outputfile}</echo>
  </target>
  <target name="all" description="Build the project" depends="info,deploy,compile,copy"/>
  <target name="clean" description="Clean the project">
    <delete includeemptydirs="true" quiet="true">
      <fileset dir="${output.dir}" includes="**/*"/>
    </delete>
  </target>
  <target name="deploy" description="Deploy JDeveloper profiles" depends="init">
    <taskdef name="ojdeploy" classname="oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.ant.OJDeployAntTask" uri="oraclelib:OJDeployAntTask"
             classpath="${oracle.jdeveloper.ant.library}"/>
    <ora:ojdeploy xmlns:ora="oraclelib:OJDeployAntTask" executable="${oracle.jdeveloper.ojdeploy.path}"
                  ora:buildscript="${oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.dir}/ojdeploy-build.xml"
                  ora:statuslog="${oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.dir}/ojdeploy-statuslog.xml">
      <ora:deploy>
        <ora:parameter name="workspace" value="${oracle.jdeveloper.workspace.path}"/>
        <ora:parameter name="project" value="${oracle.jdeveloper.project.name}"/>
        <ora:parameter name="profile" value="${oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.profile.name}"/>
        <ora:parameter name="nocompile" value="false"/>
        <ora:parameter name="outputfile" value="${oracle.jdeveloper.deploy.outputfile}"/>
      </ora:deploy>
    </ora:ojdeploy>
  </target>
  <target name="compile" description="Compile Java source files" depends="init">
    <javac destdir="${output.dir}" classpathref="classpath" debug="${javac.debug}" nowarn="${javac.nowarn}"
           deprecation="${javac.deprecation}" encoding="UTF8" source="1.7" target="1.7" includeantruntime="false">
      <src path="src"/>
    </javac>
  </target>
  <target name="copy" description="Copy files to output directory" depends="init">
    <patternset id="copy.patterns">
      <include name="**/*.GIF"/>
      <include name="**/*.JPEG"/>
      <include name="**/*.JPG"/>
      <include name="**/*.PNG"/>
      <include name="**/*.cpx"/>
      <include name="**/*.dcx"/>
      <include name="**/*.ejx"/>
      <include name="**/*.gif"/>
      <include name="**/*.ini"/>
      <include name="**/*.jpeg"/>
      <include name="**/*.jpg"/>
      <include name="**/*.png"/>
      <include name="**/*.properties"/>
      <include name="**/*.sva"/>
      <include name="**/*.tag"/>
      <include name="**/*.tld"/>
      <include name="**/*.wsdl"/>
      <include name="**/*.xcfg"/>
      <include name="**/*.xlf"/>
      <include name="**/*.xml"/>
      <include name="**/*.xsd"/>
      <include name="**/*.xsl"/>
      <exclude name="build.xml"/>
    </patternset>
    <copy todir="${output.dir}">
      <fileset dir="src">
        <patternset refid="copy.patterns"/>
      </fileset>
      <fileset dir=".">
        <patternset refid="copy.patterns"/>
      </fileset>
    </copy>
  </target>
</project>

The files above are the original ones and can be run from the build console to get this

Great, we now have successfully enabled CI in the cloud for the ‘Framework Extension’ project. Well, there is something more to think about. Can’t we use the same ANT build scripts on the local machine too?

Yes, we can but we have to make some adjustments for this.

Now that we read the environment from the server the ANT script is running on to set the some of the variables we need to set these environment variables on the local machine too. this can be done easily by altering the jdev start file (Linux) or using a batch to first set the environment variables and then start jdev (Windows). Below is my changes jdev start script

#!/bin/bash

#=============================================================================
#  Launcher for Oracle JDeveloper 12c (12.1.2.0.0)
#=============================================================================

unset -v GNOME_DESKTOP_SESSION_ID
export MIDDLEWARE_HOME_12C3=/opt/jdev/12.1.3.0.0/Oracle/Middleware
export ORACLE_HOME_12C3=/opt/jdev/12.1.3.0.0/Oracle/Middleware/Oracle_Home/jdeveloper
export WORKSPACE=/data/development/ENTW_12.1.3.0.0
export EXEC_SUFFIX=
/opt/jdev/12.1.3.0.0/Oracle/Middleware/Oracle_Home/jdeveloper/jdev/bin/jdev $1

As you see I set the environment variables which are later read through the build.xml file before starting jdeveloper.
The one line
export EXEC_SUFFIX=
need special attention. It’s only necessary if you run JDev using different operating systems (Linux and Windows). The build file has one variable pointing to the the ojdeploy executable
oracle.jdeveloper.ojdeploy.path=${env.ORACLE_HOME_12C3}/jdev/bin/ojdeploy${env.EXEC_SUFFIX}
Users using Windows need to add the suffix ‘.exe’ to this variable as ojdeploy can’t be started otherwise under Windows.
The problem is that we can’t add it for Linux systems as they don’t know this suffix. The solution I found is to add ${env.EXEC_SUFFIX} to the executable and set it to an empty string for Linux systems. For Windows systems you have to set this environment variable to ‘.exe’. For this I use a batch file where I use
~~~setx EXEC_SUFFIX .exe~~~
before starting JDev. In the same batch I set the other variables too

setx ORACLE_HOME_12C3 r:\Java\12.1.3.0.0\Oracle\Middleware\jdeveloper
setx MIDDLEWARE_HOME_12C3 r:\Java\12.1.3.0.0\Oracle\Middleware
setx EXEC_SUFFIX .exe

Alt NOTE
To make the build files work under Windows and Linux and iOS add an environment variable defining the suffix for executable files.

One final trick is to set the workspace directory. The build.properties file has one more environment variable workspace=${env.WORKSPACE} which we need to set.
As the workspace isn’t fix on a local machine, at least if you have more than one workspace, you can’t set this variable before you start JDev. This has to be done per workspace, when you change the workspace.
JDev has a solution for this in the ANT properties section

ANT Project Properties

ANT Project Properties


You can shoose from different variables JDev sets according to the workspace and project you are working with.
JDeveloper Variables

JDeveloper Variables

Alt NOTE
Set the env.WORKSPACE environment variable in the ANT properties of the project.

This concludes this part of the series. In the next post we finish the feature ‘feature-setup-build’ by introducing the code review function of the Oracle Developer Cloud. This will be followed by a post about building a simple ADF application with a UI which you use to show the Continuous Delivery (CD) option of the Oracle Developer Cloud.

Fasten your seat belts: Flying the Oracle Development Cloud Service (3 – Take Off – V1)

In part three of the series about the Oracle Developer Cloud we start working on a project as a member of a team in the developer cloud.

Before starting a new project some basic ground has to be covered. What architecture and technology should the project use as well as which package path to use. For the technology the the decision is easy as we want to use ADF. For the architecture we can choose on one of the patterns outlined at ‘Angles in the architecture’.

A good starting point is to introduce a for every ADF project, regardless of the architectural pattern, is a framework extension project (see ‘Extending a Helping Hand’). So we start with this too.

As a developer can’t create a new repository in a cloud project, we have to do this as a user with admin rights.


The first thing to note is that you should create an empty repository (unmark the ‘Initialize repository with README file’). If you initialize the repository with a README file, the developer can’t later just push his initial local version of the JDev workspace into the remote repository. The local repository has be updated with the README file first.

Now that the remote, empty repository exists we switch roles and work as a developer. For this we use a different login as a user who only has developer rights in the Oracle Developer Cloud.
Before the developer uses the new repository he creates a new workspace or project. We create a workspace for the framework extension library.


Next we add the ‘ADF Model Runtime’ library to the project and then the framework extension classes to the workspace.

Right now we don’t need to add or change any of the code in the created classes. If we later need to add some global functionality we come back to these classes. The next thing to do is to create an ADF library from the created classes

To make the new library available for other projects you can create a new file system connection using the same path we specified in the deployment descriptor

Later we come back to this step as we see that we have to change it a bit to make it work in the cloud. Right now we leaf it as is as this shows how you normally would do this in a normal project.
The next thing to do is to initialize a local GIT repository and push this to the Oracle Development Cloud repository as the initial master

and then push the local master branch to the Oracle Developer Cloud repository. For this we use the repository URL we get when we log into the cloud as the developer
Copy git repository address

Copy git repository address


Using this URL we push the local repository to the remote one

to finally see the changes in the cloud

More Decisions
With the basics covered we have to make another decision:
How to define the workflow for changes to make to the project sources.
Should all team members work on the trunk (called the mainline) or should each member use a branch to work on (called a feature branch). Both of these practices have their supporters and naturally opponents. The first is more CI like per definition. Feature Branches on the other side are not CI by the definition, as the code is not continuously integrated into the main line. This dispute is not for this post and may be not for this blog. Anyway, lets start with feature branching.
This allows us to show a feature of the Oracle Developer Cloud as it allows for code reviews which are mostly used if you work with feature branches, but can be used for the other practice too.

Feature: add build files
The feature we implement is to setup a build system for our framework extension project. We name the feature ‘feature-setup-build’


We learned in part 1 that the Oracle Developer Cloud provides a Continuous Integration server (CI). We plan to use this CI server to build our library whenever the code changes. For this we need to use ANT or Maven as the build system. For this project we choose ANT and can now build the needed build.xml files from the project

To finish this part we add the new files to our local repository and then push them to the remote as a new branch.

We push the local changes to the remote repository in the cloud using the same branch name

We had not looked into the created build.xml file or the build.properties files, we had them just created and pushed them into the repository. Question is, will they work?
Let’s try it on the local machine first.

Now we can run the ANT target ‘all’ which is the default one.
Well, as JDev 12.1.3 has somehow eliminated the ANT tool bar buttons running ANT on a project is a bit cumbersome (hopefully the ANT build buttons are back with the next release)

OK, this works like a charm.

As this post is already very long, we split the take off into two parts, V1 and ROTATE. This concludes part V1. Next time we make the necessary changes to the build files to integrate them to the clouds build system and start the CI process.

Note: for those who wonder about the terms V1 and ROTATE:
– V1 is the maximum speed at which an aircraft pilot may abort a takeoff without causing a runway overrun
– ROTATE or Vr is the speed of an aircraft at which the pilot initiates rotation to obtain the scheduled takeoff performance