Summary of Day 5 at Oracle Open World 2016

I started the day with a session on Alta UI ‘Implementing Oracle’s New Alta UI Features’ by Richard Wright. Richard started by giving some reasoning about why Oracle developed Alta UI. It was manly because the users demanded a more mobile friendly UI. The biggest change which came with Alta UI was that the UI has to be build by thinking ‘mobile first’ and by more designing the flow of operations by personas. Only then you gain the full advantage of the Alta UI.

Transforming a older (legacy) application to a modern application using the Alta UI is not just migrating the skin. You have to redo the UI and design it for mobile first.This means that you have to think about different device sizes which in the end means that you have to design the application in a responsive manner.

Here the page stretches on the device. This is mostly not working on small devices as it makes the user to zoom into the right section to see the information. Because of hte size mobile friendly means that you try to visualize the information instead of e.g. showing the user a table. An image is giving information a human can intake more easily than  data in a table.

For a developer this means that using a list view should be preferred over using a table. A list view allows better responsive design.

Summary is that you should

  • Leverage major UI updates as an opportunity
  • Verify actual users versus previously targeted users
  • Target UI for preferred user devices
  • Understand their most important artifacts and tasks

Next session of the day was ‘Cloud-Native Application Development with Oracle Application Container Cloud‘ by Shaun Smith, Anand Kothari and Eric Jacobsen. This session is about the Oracle Application Container Cloud Service which lets you run native Java SE applications or Node.js based application run in the cloud.

I already mentioned the ‘Cloud Native Architecture’ on day 2.

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and the demands on the application development

and tools to use to make this architecture work from Oracles point of view

The Application Container Cloud should allow you to make such development simpley by

  • Develop
  • Zip
  • Deploy

your application. This can be done on a polyglot platform using java, php, Node.js and later even Ruby and Java EE. It’s an open platform allowing you to run many applications. Oracle provides a Linux system and you can bring what ever you like.

All this runs on Docker containers. The only constraint is that the applications must be stateless, as the containers are build up and shut down on the fly to load balance your application. This is done automatically without you needing to interfere.

Once your application runs monitoring the JVM or the performance of the application is done via the cloud services. Patching, if needed, is done for you too. Not that you don’t know about it, but it’s just a click on a button. If you don’t like the patch because it breaks your application you can easily rollback the patch


Final session of the day and OOW 2016 for me was ‘Using Docker with Continuous Delivery in Oracle Cloud‘ by Greg Stachnick and Mike Raab. This session talked about how Docker is used in the Oracle Container Cloud Service to allow agile, containerized development in the cloud.

The first part was about the developers cloud which was covered in almost every session about the cloud.

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Second part was about the Container Cloud Service and it’s base implementation StackEngine (a company bought by Oracle end of last year).

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Key features of the Container Cloud are shown in the image below:

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When setting up a service in a docker container the UI looks like

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Changes made in the UI are reflected directly in a docker run script (which you can get on the same page). Spinning up a new container is a matter of two clicks:

Stacks are the equivalent to Dockers composer but have some add on like you are able to add parameters to the containers.

In the end the Container Cloud service is a flexible ‘bring your own’ container and run it in hte cloud. Don’t forget to bring the needed licences too 🙂

Product will be available within the next 12 month!


That was the OOW2016 for me. See you next year!

 

 

Summary of Day 3 at Oracle Open World 2016

Started with the (early) morning keynote ‘Oracle OpenWorld Tuesday Morning Keynote‘ hosted by Bhanu Murthy B. M., Safra Catz, Hon. Chief Minister Shri. Devendra Fadnavis and Thomas Kurian.

As the keynote and it’s content is covered all over the media already I won’t add to this. Oh, one thing I like to say is that the ‘live’ demos did not really look live to me. Would you risk that your ‘live’ demo is going to hell because of some technical problem with Thomas Kurian on stage?


Next on my list for today was ‘Agile Development and DevOps Done Even Faster with Oracle IaaS and PaaS‘ by Michael Lehmann, Suhas Uliyar and  Siddhartha Agarwal. This session talked about agile development in the cloud using IaaS, PaaS and Microservices together with DevOps tools like Docker.

First a Cloud Navtive Architecture was introduced:

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Cloud Native Architecture

 Multiple services working together to build the cloud native architecture
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Services for the Cloud Native Architecture

The practical part was a sample which showed how to build, deploy, or manage mobile-fronted, API-first autoscaling application, a microservice build on Node.js here, live on stage. New here is htat you can use the Management Cloud Service to introspect the microservice to see how it runs on your environment. The just build service then is consumned by anohter app (mobile using MAX) to visualize the data.

The final dashboard build for the mobile app, it took only about 20 minutes to build and deploy:

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Dashboard for the Mobile Application

and the final detailed architecture of the application:

Detailed Architecture

Detailed Architecture


Next on my Cloud program was ‘Development Operations in the Cloud: A Use Case and Best Practices‘ by Greg Stachnick and Jeff Stephenson. They talked about best practices using the Cloud Services to develop applications from the modern DevOps point of view.

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Modern DevOps

The case study was about the development of the Developers Cloud Service itself, neat!

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Developers Cloud Service Outline

This is a big project which is running completely in the cloud. Here is an image that shows a code review screen (sorry for the poor quality)

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Code Review

After accepting the changes the changes are pushed back to the mail line, triggering the next integration cycle in the continuous integration system. The typical cloud developers life is

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Day  in the Life of a Devloper

and the day of a manager

to summarize these points

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Summary

This summary hit the nail on the head. I’ve bin a contractor in many projects, always asking for more machines or more power. I would be happy if I could spin up another machine to do some testing instead of waiting for some other things to finish using the machine I wait for.


Before my day is over there are two sessions about ADF and JDeveloper to attend. First was Shay Schmeltzer with ‘Oracle Application Development Framework and Oracle JDeveloper: What’s New‘ which reveals what’s coming up in the world of ADF and JDeveloper. Shay started with the short history of ADF and JDev

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which is even longer if you count JBO to it too, which started 1999. Impressive. The session was more about features which are new in JDev 12.2.1 and JDev 12.2.1.1, both versions are out quite some time.  So, nothing new for seasoned ADF developers at the beginning.

Not so well known are ADF Business Components Triggers which are more known by Forms developers. They allow to do things right before or after some DB events fires.

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ADF BC REST Services and REST DataControl are better known if you work in the cloud or with mobile applications:

Remote Regions where introduced with JDev 12.2.1 but needed a patch to make them run (fixed in 12.2.1.1):

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Remote Task Flows:

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UI stuff like responsive support through templates (Tablet First), Massonry Layout and matchmediaqueries:

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Lots of new and changed data visualization components:

and finally to sum things up, other enhancements behind the scenes:

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For the future we can expect more and easier support for REST services and writing Groovy code. The biggest change will be the integration of JET Composite Components into ADF pages. JET Composite Components are an equivalent to ADF Declarative Components. You can build components from using other components, add properties to them to influence their behavior. Composite Components fire events which you can use to interact. Not sure how this will work, other that in the end you have HTML. Bad thing is that there is not even a time frame for this. More details in hte next section.

Anyway, ADF is not dead! There will be future development and enhancements in JDeveloper and ADF.


Final session for this long day ‘Oracle Development Tools and Frameworks: Which One Is Right for You?‘ by Shay Shmeltzer (again) and Denis Tyrell. As some of the features are not available at the moment the ‘Safe Harbor’ statement comes to play. So if you see something which you don’t find in the available version, you have to patiantly wait for it. No time frame given 😦

Shay summarized the different frameworks ADF, MAF, JET and ABCS and pointed out their key features. As the frameworks are well known I spare most details. As promised I give more detail about the Oracle JET Composite Components.

Sample JET Composite Components

Sample JET Composite Components

Key features of JET Composite Components and there basic structure is shown below

(Coming soon!) The composite components end up together in a Tenant Component Catalog where the components can be filtered by their characteristics

 

Which late will be extended so that components are available from different channels

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In the end there will be Project Visual Code provides a low code environment

Project Visual Code

Project Visual Code

After this deep dive into JET Composite Components I present the summary of the session which shows which development framework is used for which development

At the end of the session Shay and Denis answered some question which are noteworthy. I Cant remember all question but tried to summarize the key points from the answers:

  1. Oracle focuses on JET as the future development environment Future focus on jet. Why? ADF is already feature rich and the developer don’t ask for much more.
  2. Developers want more client side development. Demand on server generated UI is going to decline.
  3. JET will get offline capabilities! This can’t be done easily with ADF.
  4. JET allows faster exchange of libraries. JavaScript developers tend to rewrite their UI faster then ADF developers (see yesterdays summary where Geertjan Wielenga made the same point).
  5.  Public Component Catalog is only public to a point. You have to submit components which then will be vetted by someone before other users can use them.
  6. Cloud IDE (writing code in the cloud) will have JavaScript capabilities
  7. ABCS (Application Builder Cloud Service) is not available on premise right now
  8. For declarative JET development look at ABCS. ABCS allows to get the underlying JET code (save as) so you can look at the code and change it, e.g. to use it elsewhere.